Enrichment Education

Nearly half of college grads feel unqualified for entry-level jobs, poll says

Around 39 percent of respondents said they were not ready for the job because they did not have all the qualifications listed in a job description.
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  • A new survey found 49 percent of U.S. adults who graduated in the past 12 months did not believe they were prepared for a particular job.

  • The report also found recent graduates harbor regrets about their degree programs. 

  • Only 25 percent of graduates surveyed said they would choose the same career path.

Nearly half of recent college graduates did not apply for entry-level jobs because they felt they were unqualified for the position, according to a new survey.  

A survey conducted in May by Cengage, a global education technology company, found that 49 percent of U.S. adults who graduated in the past 12 months did not believe they were prepared for a particular job. 

Around 39 percent of respondents said they were not ready for the job because they did not have all the qualifications listed in a job description.  

“Various economic circumstances – inflation spiking, job opportunities and resignations flourishing, and a potential recession looming – are pushing many graduates to question their education and career choices,” Michael E. Hansen, CEO of Cengage Group, said in a news release.  

“On top of that, a growing focus on skills-based hiring juxtaposed with the stigma of non-degree programs are leaving graduates confused about what education pathways provide a good return on investment and best prepare them for the workforce,” Hansen said. 

The report also found recent graduates harbor regrets about their degree programs, with 55 percent of graduates saying they had second thoughts about their degree before deciding it was too late to turn back. Only 25 percent of graduates surveyed said they would choose the same career path.  


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Still, 67 percent of graduates said a college degree was necessary for their current job.  

“Employers today desperately need workers who possess the skills needed to perform specialized, modern-day work, and we’re seeing many workers pursue shorter-term online training courses that allow them to acquire these skills more quickly and affordably, Hansen continued.  


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