Story at a glance

  • The COVID-19 vaccine doses will be allocated across 400 ZIP codes in California, with a focus on areas in Los Angeles County and the Central Valley.
  • Demographic information, such as housing status, income and education level were used to determine if a ZIP code was eligible to be included in the 40 percent vaccine distribution plan.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) plans on allocating 40 percent of the state’s vaccine doses within the most vulnerable neighborhoods in a bid to increase the equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccinations.

Two officials from Newsom’s administration spoke to The Associated Press (AP) anonymously on Wednesday regarding the initiative. 

The COVID-19 vaccine doses will be allocated across 400 ZIP codes in California, with a focus on areas in Los Angeles County and the Central Valley, which have had particularly high rates of infection. This represents about 8 million people.

Demographic information, such as housing status, income and education level were used to determine if a ZIP code was eligible to be included in the 40 percent vaccine distribution plan.

Statewide data reports that more than 9.4 million vaccine doses have already been administered. A total of 12 million have been distributed, with most going toward Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange and Riverside Counties — all located in the southern region of the state. 

California also reports on the racial makeup of the recipients of the vaccine doses. White Californians make up a plurality of residents who have been vaccinated, with Latino residents making up the second largest demographic who have been inoculated against COVID-19.

Given the stable number of new cases and small declines seen in hospitalizations and deaths, the increased vaccine distribution has prompted California to look at reopening certain economic sectors. 

The majority of the state is still experiencing what California officials have deemed “widespread” COVID-19 risk levels, with a total of 18 counties eligible for select reopenings due to smaller levels of virus transmission. 

Despite these improvements, public health officials and President Biden have warned against reopening too quickly, as this has historically led to severe outbreaks.

Published on Mar 04, 2021