Respect Diversity + Inclusion

New York is giving $10M to support Asian American communities

Dr. Michelle Lee, left, a radiology resident, and Ida Chen, right, a physician assistant student, unfold a banner Lee created to display at rallies protesting anti-Asian hate, Saturday April 24, 2021, in New York’s Chinatown.  Bebeto Matthews/ AP

Story at a glance

  • The state of New York is awarding $10 million to multiple Asian American support organizations.
  • It is the largest investment in the Asian American community in New York state history.
  • Asian Americans have experienced a sharp rise in hate crime attacks across the country.

New York has pledged $10 million for groups that provide services to Asian American communities disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

On Monday, Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) announced multiple organizations, including the Asian American Federation (AAF), the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families (CACF) and the Chinese-American Planning Council (CPC), will receive funding totaling $10 million. The money is intended to bring services and supportive programs directly to New York’s Asian American communities.  

Hochul’s office said the award money will be the largest investment in the Asian American community in New York State history. 

“The Asian American community was especially hard hit, not only by the virus, but by an increase in hate and violent crimes. With this $10 million in funding, we are sending a strong message that hate has no home here, and we will continue to stand shoulder to shoulder with our sisters and brothers in the Asian American community,” said Hochul. 


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The AAF will receive $6.8 million in funding to reinforce community support offered by a network of organizations that have witnessed a sudden increase in demand for services because of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

AAF will also direct funding to 59 additional community organizations that provide direct services, case management and mental health support that serve Asian New Yorkers throughout the state. 

“With the tragedies that our community has experienced since the start of the pandemic, and painfully so over the last few months, many Asian Americans are fearful for their own lives when stepping out of their homes. Governor Hochul’s leadership shows that our voice is not going unheard as we ask for support to overcome this trauma,” said Jo-Ann Yoo, executive director of AAF. 

The CACF will get more than $1 million to enhance youth and young adult services targeting Asian American communities by focusing on social emotional development and mental well-being, while the CPC will get nearly $700,000 to support community services and programs that improve social determinants of health for children, youth, students, families and seniors.  

CPC will also use the money to expand public access to resources, expand its workforce, enhance case management and expand early childhood development programs. 

The New York State Assembly is also directing $1.4 million in legislative aid to another 40 organizations that serve a variety of Asian American communities across the state. 

Hochul’s announcement comes as Michelle Alyssa Go, an Asian American woman, was killed after a man pushed her onto subway tracks before an oncoming train. Another 61-year-old Chinese immigrant was violently attacked in New York City in April 2021 and later died from the injuries he sustained.  

Hate crimes against Asian Americans have been on the rise, with data from the Justice Department finding 62 percent of hate crime victims were targeted because of the offenders’ bias toward race, ethnicity and ancestry in 2020. Anti-Black and anti-Asian hate crimes continue to be the largest bias incident victim category.


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