Story at a glance

  • Old Town Alexandria recently removed a well known Confederate statue "Appomattox."
  • The statue is reportedly owned by the group The United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Attention on the presence of Confederate statues across the nation has been renewed amid protests following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, and now, one of those statues has been removed a month ahead of schedule.

In Old Town Alexandria, outside of Washington, D.C., the statue named “Appomattox” was removed on Tuesday morning by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

 

 

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CNN reports that the controversial monument, which was installed in 1889, was meant to honor Confederate soldiers from Alexandria, with its back intentionally turned to the North. 

A spokesperson for the city told reporters at CNN that “the owner of the statue notified the City yesterday that they would remove the statue this morning.”


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In a statement published on the United Daughters of the Confederacy's website on Dec. 1, 2018, the organization said that although it “totally denounces any individual or group that promotes racial divisiveness or white supremacy,” it wants to continue to honor the memory of fallen Confederate soldiers. 

“We are saddened that some people find anything connected with the Confederacy to be offensive. Our Confederate ancestors were and are Americans. We as an organization do not sit in judgment of them nor do we impose the standards of the 21st century on these Americans of the 19th century,” the statement reads.


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The United Daughters of the Confederacy did not respond to The Hill's request for comment in time for publication.

As a state, Virginia has recently taken legislative steps to walk back its memorials honoring its Confederate heritage. In February, the state legislature abolished as a state holiday Lee-Jackson Day, which was named for two prominent Confederate generals, Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. 

Other states, such as Alabama, have seen Confederate statues come down during the current protests against police brutality and racial inequality. In Birmingham, a statue of former Confederate Navy Captain Thomas Linn was torn down


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Published on Jun 02, 2020