Story at a glance

  • Protesters are calling on city leaders to meet a list of 24 demands before removing the cement barricades.
  • Demands include holding the trial for the four ex-Minneapolis officers charged in Floyd’s death, recalling Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman and firing four top Bureau of Criminal Apprehension officials.
  • WCCO reports the city has seen an uptick in violence with deadly incidents taking place in or near the memorial site over the past several weeks.

Protesters are pushing back against the City of Minneapolis’ plan to remove cement barricades around the George Floyd memorial, calling on city leaders to meet a list of demands before the barricades blocking traffic are removed, according to local WCCO

The outlet reports city employees last week met with business owners and community leaders and announced plans to begin reopening the intersection where “George Floyd Square” is located sometime next week. The barricades have been up around the memorial site near where Floyd was killed since early June. 


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Now protesters say they themselves will maintain the barricades around the memorial unless the city meets a list of 24 demands

The demands include holding the trial for the four ex-Minneapolis officers charged in Floyd’s death, recalling Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman, firing four top Bureau of Criminal Apprehension officials and investing $400,000 in a youth jobs program. 

The move by protesters has gained the support of the National Lawyers Guild of Minnesota that called the memorial “inherently a space of protest.”

“The people of George Floyd Square have developed very clear demands that need to be met and have openly communicated to the city what needs to happen in order for negotiations regarding the removal of the barricades to begin,” the guild wrote in a Facebook post

WCCO reports the city has seen an uptick in violence with deadly incidents taking place in or near the memorial site over the past several weeks, with police officers saying they’ve been met by “hostile crowds.” A claim that has been disputed by protesters. 

Floyd died on Memorial Day after now-former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes as Floyd pleaded with the officer that he couldn’t breathe. 

Cellphone video of the incident sparked widespread outrage and weeks of demonstrations in many cities across the country and around the world, bringing the issues of racial injustice and police brutality to the forefront of the national conversation. 

Published on Aug 13, 2020