Sustainability Climate Change

Department of Energy grants $14 million to track extreme weather and climate change

“We must expand our understanding of changing weather patterns and equip scientists, researchers, and lawmakers with every possible tool to tackle the climate crisis.”
Emissions from a coal-fired plant.
The Associated Press/John Amis

Story at a glance


  • A growing proportion of Americans are concerned with the physical ramifications of extreme weather. 

  • Researchers across 11 states and Canada were granted funds to better predict and track these events.

  • The move is part of President Biden’s efforts to tackle climate change and significantly curb U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

As the nation continues to suffer the immediate ramifications of climate change, new funds allocated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will help experts improve understanding of the Earth’s atmosphere and better predict weather events.

The $14 million was granted to 22 different projects which will tackle issues ranging from Arctic weather to cloud formation. Proposals were selected through a competitive peer review process under the Atmospheric System Research program, which is funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research

The move is part of President Biden’s campaign to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, an effort that suffered a setback in last week’s Supreme Court ruling against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 


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“We must expand our understanding of changing weather patterns and equip scientists, researchers, and lawmakers with every possible tool to tackle the climate crisis,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm in a press release on the grants.

“President Biden and DOE are committed to protecting American communities from extreme weather events and fighting climate change through critical investments in science and research that illuminate pathways to decarbonization and broaden our scientific foundation.” 

Two research organizations and faculty at 18 universities will conduct the research, taking place in 11 different states and Canada. Researchers will investigate how clouds and aerosols like volcanic ash interact, along with their effects on solar energy in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. 

The Biden Administration has a goal of reducing greenhouse gas pollution by 50 to 52 percent by 2030 compared with 2005 levels. Through funding, the administration also hopes to increase climate resilience for vulnerable communities and improve preparedness for climate-related disasters. 

Impacts of climate change have become top of mind for most Americans, as the majority report concern about displacement from extreme weather. Many Americans also do not support the Supreme Court’s recent decision curbing EPA’s power to regulate emissions.