Story at a glance

  • Companies including Apple and Dell urge Biden to set ambitious new goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Many of the companies already have their individual climate action plans.
  • This follows the Biden administration’s decision on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

A bevy of corporations issued a collective letter to President Biden, urging him to set a federal target to cut carbon emissions.

Organized by the We Mean Business coalition, 310 companies including IKEA, Ralph Lauren, Johnson & Johnson, Dell, Apple, McDonald’s, Target and more signed an open letter asking Biden to formally adopt a national target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent below 2005 emissions levels no later than 2030.

This coincides with Biden’s well-publicized plan to make the U.S. economy carbon neutral by 2035.

“A bold 2030 target is needed to catalyze a zero-emissions future, spur a robust economic recovery, create millions of well-paying jobs, and allow the U.S. to 'build back better' from the pandemic,” the letter reads. 


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The letter also adds that many of the signatories have adopted their own company plans to slash emissions that fall in line with the Paris Agreement goals, which aim to halt global temperatures from rising by two degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. 

One of Biden’s first executive orders while in office was to have the U.S. rejoin the Paris Agreement after former President Trump removed the country from the international accord.

“While an effective national climate strategy will require all of us, you alone can set the course by swiftly establishing a bold U.S. 2030 target,” the companies write.

In total, the signatories represent more than $1 trillion in assets along with nearly 60 million American employees.

“The U.S. business community is committed to doing its part to reduce emissions because it is good for the economy and helps us build back better. Companies want to work with the Biden administration toward a better future for all,” said María Mendiluce, CEO of the We Mean Business coalition. “I applaud businesses and investors for raising their voices in support of at least halving U.S. emissions by 2030.”

This comes as the Biden administration declined to halt the construction of the embattled Dakota Access Pipeline, an oil pipe running over 1,000 miles from Illinois to North Dakota. 

Activists have noted that the pipeline cuts into the ancestral lands of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which could potentially endanger the population’s water supply. 

An environmental impact review is still being conducted. Once it is completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a comprehensive safety review will be conducted. 


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Published on Apr 13, 2021