Story at a glance

  • Colorado Gov. Jared Polis has signed a measure that would provide $15 million to coal dependent workers and localities to help them transition to clean energy.
  • The bipartisan bill, which finances the Office of Just Transition created in 2019, will allocate $8 million from Colorado’s general fund to pay for economic development and another $7 million to aid coal workers.
  • “While clean energy projects are cementing their place in Colorado’s future, it’s on us to make sure traditionally coal dependent communities aren’t left behind,” state Senate Majority Leader Steve Fenberg said.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis has signed a measure that would provide $15 million to coal dependent workers and localities to help them transition to clean energy. 

Polis said the law, which is designed in part to help those who’ve lost their jobs, is “an important down payment on helping people get the jobs of the future, which is why we included it in our state stimulus package,” The Denver Post reported

“The key to a truly just transition unlocks new opportunities in more places than ever before — not only to provide jobs, but to support schools, and improve systems that are critical to powering our communities,” Polis continued.

The bipartisan bill, which finances the Office of Just Transition created in 2019, will allocate $8 million from Colorado’s general fund to pay for economic development and another $7 million to aid coal workers. 

“While clean energy projects are cementing their place in Colorado’s future, it’s on us to make sure traditionally coal dependent communities aren’t left behind,” said Senate Majority Leader Steve Fenberg, according to The Post.


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Polis’s guidelines, along with 2019 state laws, have set goals to reduce carbon emissions from 2005 levels by at least 50 percent by 2030. The Post reported that Colorado lawmakers unveiled in January  a 207-page “roadmap” to slash greenhouse gas emissions that employs a cross sector approach. 

“There is no single ‘silver bullet’ solution,” the plan says, per the paper. “Modeling shows that a ‘silver buckshot’ approach of reductions across all the major sectors is needed.”

President Biden set a goal at the Leaders Summit on Climate in April to reduce U.S. carbon emissions by 50 percent by 2030. The president additionally re-entered the Paris Climate Agreement, which has the expressed goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050 compared to pre-industrial levels. 


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Published on Jul 01, 2021