Story at a glance

  • Friday marks July’s full buck moon.
  • July’s full moon got its name from the Algonquin tribes in the northeastern United States, signifying the time of year when bucks would grow new antlers.
  • The full buck moon may give off a deep reddish-orange hue due to the effects of numerous raging wildfires in the western United States.

A full moon set to rise this Friday may look different than in recent years.

Called the full buck moon, July’s full moon got its name from the Algonquin tribes in the northeastern United States, signifying the time of year when bucks would grow new antlers, according to Farmer’s Almanac. It’s been given other names as well, such as by farmers who sometimes refer to it as full hay moon, as it coincides with when they cut and cure their hay.


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July 23’s full buck moon may give off a deep reddish-orange hue due to the effects of numerous raging wildfires in the western United States.

The hazardous effects of the numerous fires on the West Coast have already been felt on the East Coast. Areas from New York to Washington, D.C., are experiencing hazy skies and air quality alerts as smoke from the wildfires have drifted across the country.

According to NASA, the full buck moon will rise on Friday night and reach its peak at 10:37 p.m. EDT.


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Published on Jul 21, 2021