Story at a glance

  • Wolf hunting is legal in several states, including Wisconsin, where tracking dogs are also permitted to join the hunt.
  • In February, wolf hunters killed 216 wolves, surpassing the state quota of 119 wolves out of the state's population of 1,000.
  • Local advocates are asking regulators to cut the upcoming quota by the 83 percent killed over the legal limit.

After one-third of the state's wolves were slaughtered in the last hunt, conservation advocates are asking Wisconsin to subtract the overkill from the quota for the upcoming hunt.  

"No segment of Wisconsin’s hunting community should encourage the intentional overkilling of a game animal, as was evidenced in the last February wolf hunt. Holding wolf hunters accountable for their intentional violation of Wisconsin’s state-licensed wolf quota by reducing future quotas to account for over quota kills would discourage future delayed reporting as a tactic to extend the wolf hunting season," said Wolf Patrol, a conservation group, in a recent post.


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA

WOMAN PUNCHES CROCODILE TO SAVE HER TWIN SISTER

NEW STUDY NAMES THE 10 SMELLIEST STATES IN THE US

CICADAS OVERRUN WHITE HOUSE PRESS PLANE

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ANNOUNCES EARTH HAS A FIFTH OCEAN


After courts ruled in favor of hunting organizations and the Trump administration removed wolves’ Endangered Species Act protections, Wisconsin's first regulated (and state mandated) wolf hunt since 2014 began in February. Before regulators could shut it down, a third of Wisconsin's wolves were killed. The 216 wolves killed by wolf hunters, many of whom used tracking dogs, surpassed the state’s quote of 119 wolves by 83 percent. 

The Wolf Patrol compiled documentation of illegal wolf hunting practices and reports from the aftermath of last February's hunt. The group is asking the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to adjust the quota for the November hunt, which is mandated by state law.


America is changing faster than ever! Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


Without the ability to identify the killers, the DNR can't punish hunters who overshoot their quota — a system that seems unfair to the local Indigenous tribe, whose annual harvest of fish carefully monitored.

“We believe the wolf is our brother, and what happens to the wolf happens to us,” Mic Isham, a member of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band and a long-time wildlife official for the tribe, told the Guardian. “We believe the proper number [of hunting permits] is zero.” 

The tribe was allocated 81 wolf permits and chose to kill none — but overkill by other hunters surpassed even this number.


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA

FORD UNVEILS NEW HYBRID PICKUP THAT GETS 40 MPG FOR UNDER $20,000

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 3,000 YEARS, TASMANIAN DEVILS HAVE BEEN BORN ON AUSTRALIAN MAINLAND

‘EXTINCT’ GIANT TORTOISE FOUND IN GALAPAGOS

CONSERVATIONISTS THRILLED AS ‘EXTINCT’ WILD RIVER PREDATOR POPS UP

KIA INTRODUCES NEW ELECTRIC VEHICLE THAT CAN CHARGE IN LESS THAN 20 MINUTES


 

Published on Jul 28, 2021