Sustainability Environment

Rare snake native to Alabama may be making a comeback

Stock image of an eastern indigo snake (sstaton/iStock)

Story at a glance

  • The eastern indigo snake was once native to Alabama but was declared “threatened” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1978 after not being seen in the state since the 1950s.
  • A “wild-hatched” eastern indigo snake was found on March 16, making it the second snake of the species to be discovered in Alabama in more than 60 years.
  • The Eastern Indigo Project has been releasing the snakes into the Conecuh National Forest since 2010 with hopes of reintroducing the species to its native area.

Conservationists are hopeful that a rare snake native to Alabama may be making a comeback after one was discovered last week in the state. 

A “wild-hatched” eastern indigo snake was found on March 16, making it the second snake of the species to be discovered in Alabama in more than 60 years.    

The young snake was found yesterday and is the product of natural pairings among those purposefully released in Conecuh National Forest,” Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division wrote on Facebook. 


America is changing faster than ever! Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news. 


The hatchling is the result of the Eastern Indigo Project, which began in 2006. The eastern indigo snake was once native to Alabama but was declared “threatened” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1978 after not being seen in the state since the 1950s.  

The Eastern Indigo Project has been releasing the snakes into the Conecuh National Forest since 2010 with hopes of reintroducing the species to its native area.   

Tim Mersmann, district ranger for the Conecuh National Forest in Alabama, said in a press release, “Multiple agencies focused on restoring the entire ecosystem, and the reintegration of the indigo snake species to the whole system is very satisfying.” 


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA 
CANCER DEATHS CONTINUE TO DROP IN US 
1.9M NEW CANCER DIAGNOSES EXPECTED IN 2022, REPORT SAYS 
FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE TO RELEASE NINE ENDANGERED RED WOLVES NEAR THE OUTER BANKS  
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT TO ERASE $415 MILLION IN STUDENT LOAN DEBT FOR NEARLY 16,000 BORROWERS 
JUST 20 MINUTES OF DAILY EXERCISE AT 70 COULD STAVE OFF MAJOR HEART DISEASE: STUDY