Story at a glance

  • Peruvians from the Huinchiri community are working to rebuild an Incan hanging string bridge.
  • For more than 500 years, the Q’eswachaka Bridge in Canas, Peru, has been used to cross the Apurimac River and connect local communities.
  • The bridge began to collapse in March, and now members of the Huinchiri community are reweaving the bridge.

Peruvians from the Huinchiri community are working to rebuild an Incan hanging string bridge using traditional weaving methods.

For more than 500 years, the Q’eswachaka Bridge in Canas, Peru, has been used to cross the Apurimac River and connect local communities. However, the bridge began to collapse in March. 

“Last year because of the pandemic, it wasn’t strengthened. … That is why at the beginning of this year the bridge fell,” Cusco Regional Gov. Jean Paul Benavente told Reuters.


America is changing faster than ever! Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


Members of the Huinchiri community began on both sides of the ravine, balancing on large main ropes above the river, slowly weaving their way toward the center as they reinforced the bridge. 

“Now it is like an answer to the pandemic itself,” Benavente said. “From the depths of the Peruvian Andean identity, this bridge is strung up across the Apurimac basin and we can tell the world that we are coming out of this little by little.”


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ANNOUNCES EARTH HAS A FIFTH OCEAN

LUMBER CRISIS IS ENCOURAGING TREE POACHERS ARMED WITH CHAINSAWS

BIDEN TO INVEST $100B ON INTERNET FOR ALL AMERICANS

CULTURAL PRESSURES RUNNING HIGH AS MARTIN SCORSESE STARTS FILMING ‘KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON’

HAALAND ANNOUNCES NEW INDIGENOUS MISSING & MURDERED UNIT

Published on Jun 16, 2021