Story at a glance

  • The poll asked more than 1,000 Americans which stimulus measures would be most effective to stave off economic fallout.
  • Americans said paid sick leave, COVID-19 testing and suspension of evictions would be the most beneficial.
  • The poll also found Americans are not exactly sure where the funds from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economy Security Act signed into law in March were dispersed.

As Congress is under the gun to pass another round of coronavirus relief and House Democrats are planning to unveil another Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economy Security Act (CARES 2) package in the coming days, a recently released poll is shedding some light on the opinions of Americans on the first CARES Act, the law intended to address the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S.

A recent poll by ZenBusiness asked more than 1,000 Americans which proposed stimulus measures, both those in the CARES Act and those that didn’t, would be most effective at warding off major economic consequences. 


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The poll found respondents believed paid sick leave (nearly 88 percent), free COVID-19 testing (86 percent) and suspension of evictions or foreclosures (83 percent) would be most effective in providing economic relief, all of which are included in the CARES Act. 

More than 4 in 5 Americans believed suspending rent collection would be an effective economic relief measure, as well as direct cash payments to all Americans. That’s followed by delaying the payment deadline for federal or state taxes (78 percent), emergency assistance for the homeless, (77.8 percent) and the suspension of debt collection (77 percent.) 

Just 67 percent of Americans believed emergency funds for major industries, such as airlines and restaurants, would be effective, while a little more than 19 percent said the government should take no action and proceed “with business as usual.”

The poll also found Americans are not exactly sure where the funds are being allocated. 

The survey asked participants to estimate the funds allocated to individuals, large corporations, small corporations, small businesses, state and local governments and public health, and found those polled underestimated how the funds were distributed among the groups included in the CARES Act. 

At least 67 percent of respondents estimated $469 billion of funds in the CARES Act would be allocated toward individuals, falling short of the actual estimate of $560 billion. Twenty-seven percent correctly reported $500 billion would be distributed to large corporations, while the average estimate was slightly lower at 492 billion. Another 60 percent of Americans underestimated the amount of money given to small businesses by more than $185 billion, and more than half underestimated the amount given to state and local governments by more than $170 billion.


BREAKING NEWS ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

WHO: THERE'S NO EVIDENCE WEARING A MASK WILL PROTECT YOU FROM CORONAVIRUS

HERE'S WHEN THE CORONAVIRUS WILL PEAK IN YOUR STATE

FAUCI PREDICTS ANOTHER CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK IN THE FALL WITH A 'VERY DIFFERENT' OUTCOME

BILL GATES SEES RNA VACCINES AS BEST OPTION FOR QUICK CORONAVIRUS TREATMENT

NEW REPORT SAYS CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC COULD LAST UP TO 2 YEARS


 

Published on May 06, 2020