Well-Being Mental Health

The pandemic is still influencing how happy we are

“We’ve all been through some very tough years, and around the world, we’re short on happiness,” one expert said.
a man sits alone at a table during a party
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Story at a glance


  • The Oracle Happiness Report released earlier this month shows the pandemic has left people across the globe feeling deprived of and searching for happiness.

  • Nearly 90 percent of those surveyed looked to shop their way into happiness through online ordering, and almost half said this made them happy.

  • Others have turned to health and wellness to escape some of their pandemic-related stress.

Nearly half of the global population said in a recent survey they have not felt true happiness since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, and a quarter indicated they have forgotten what it means to be truly happy. 

The Oracle Happiness Report released earlier this month shows that the pandemic has left people across the globe deprived of and searching for happiness.  

“We’ve all been through some very tough years, and around the world, we’re short on happiness. We’re starved for experiences that make us smile and laugh, and brands can help,” said Gretchen Rubin, five-time New York Times bestselling author and podcaster, said in a news release

“For brands aiming to contribute to the happiness of their target audience, the process starts with data and knowing your customers. Only then can you bring the appropriate mix of humor, personality, and brand experience that will drive loyalty and brand advocacy.” 

A spate of studies has consistently shown the pandemic brought Americans, especially children and teens, a series of mental health challenges. More than a quarter of U.S. parents said their child has seen a mental health specialist over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Adults also experience mental health issues and loneliness stemming from the pandemic restrictions. A study released in May suggests loneliness increased across the world during lockdowns and other mitigation measures, which led to higher levels of isolation. 


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Meanwhile, the software company found that people are searching for ways to fill the void left by the pandemic, even if it means paying high financial costs for new experiences.  

This practice follows another finding that shows more than half of the global population wish money could buy happiness.  

Nearly 90 percent of those surveyed looked to shop their way into happiness through online ordering, and almost half said this made them happy. Yet around 12 percent had trouble remembering what they actually purchased. 

Others have turned to health and wellness to escape some of their pandemic-related stress, as around 80 percent of those surveyed said they made their health and personal connections a priority.  

The report analyzed responses from a survey of more than 12,000 people — including 3,125 business leaders in the sales and customer service industry — across 14 countries from Jan. 3-27, 2022. 

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