Well-Being Prevention & Cures

New study finds factor that increases your risk of Parkinson’s by 80 percent

iStock

Story at a glance:

  • Those who experience neuroticism more are more likely to get Parkinson’s disease, suggests a new study.
    • The study looked at nearly half a million people aged 40 to 69.
    • Parkinson’s disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that affects motor skills and physical functions.

People with neuroticism — abnormally sensitive, obsessive, or tense and anxious personalities — are more likely to get Parkinson’s disease.

A new study from Florida State University College of Medicine has concluded that the data collected by the UK Biobank show a correlation between people who have anxiety and depression and Parkinson’s disease, Eat This, Not That reported.

From the mid- to late-90s, the Biobank recruited and assessed nearly half a million people aged 40 to 69 for neuroticism and followed them for 12 years. Their results were published in the journal Movement Disorders.

The scientists found that people who scored in the top quartile of neuroticism had more than an 80 percent greater risk of Parkinson’s than those with a lower score.


America is changing faster than ever! Add Changing America to your Facebook or Twitter feed to stay on top of the news.


“Anxiety and depression are comorbid with Parkinson’s disease,” said Antonio Terracciano, a geriatrics professor who led the study. “Many people with Parkinson’s tend to be anxious or tend to get depressed. Part of that could be due to the disease and how it alters the brain and can have an influence on emotions. Part could be a psychological reaction of having a diagnosis of the disease.”

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that affects motor skills and physical functions, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The brain gets damaged which causes the body’s dopamine, a compound that helps enable body movement, to decrease, gradually causing people to have tremors in one hand, then stiffness or slowing of movement commonly follows. 

Parkinson’s also affects one’s posture, making people look stooped or off balance. 

There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, but medications are available to improve symptoms, and on some occasions, doctors may suggest surgery to regulate certain regions of the brain and improve symptoms.


READ MORE STORIES FROM CHANGING AMERICA

MODERNA SAYS ITS BOOSTER SHOT AGAINST COVID-19 COULD BE AVAILABLE BY THE FALL

DENMARK PERMANENTLY STOPS USE OF ASTRAZENECA VACCINE

FAUCI EXPLAINS HOW YOU CAN GET COVID-19 EVEN AFTER YOU’VE BEEN VACCINATED

TRUMP’S CDC DIRECTOR JOINS BIG ASS FANS COMPANY, WHICH CLAIMS ITS PRODUCT KILLS CORONAVIRUS

US CALLS TO SUSPEND USE OF J&J VACCINE AFTER BLOOD CLOTTING PROBLEMS