Well-Being Prevention & Cures

Broadway ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ performances on hold until June due to COVID-19

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Story at a glance

  • The show announced on Twitter Wednesday the final performance before June 1 will take place this Sunday, Jan. 16.
  • The pause follows other performances placed on hold amid the current COVID-19 wave.
  • Broadway mask and vaccine policies are set to run through at least the end of April.

Broadway’s rendition of “To Kill a Mockingbird” will pause performances until June as the omicron coronavirus variant continues to sweep New York City.  

The show announced on Twitter Wednesday the final performance before June 1 will take place this Sunday, Jan. 16.  

“We’re excited to share that Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird will be moving to the Belasco Theatre on Wednesday, June 1. Our final performance at the Shubert Theatre will be this Sunday, January 16,” “To Kill a Mockingbird” on Broadway tweeted.  


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The pause follows other performances on hold amid the current COVID-19 wave. Five Broadway shows closed earlier than expected in December, and three more suspended performances in January, ABC 7 reported. Additionally, Broadway mask and vaccine policies are set to run through at least the end of April, according to the outlet.  

New York City has averaged nearly 25,000 new daily COVID-19 cases over the last seven days with around 29 percent of tests returning positive, according to city data. Meanwhile, the city has averaged 626 hospitalizations in the same time frame.  

Around 73 percent of the city’s population is fully vaccinated.  


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