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House GOP fight begins: Jordan challenges McCarthy

Conservative Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanTraditional media yawns as Maxine Waters gets pass on inciteful rhetoric Demings asked about Senate run after sparring with Jordan on police funding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After historic verdict, Chauvin led away in handcuffs MORE (R-Ohio) announced his bid for House minority leader on Wednesday, challenging Rep. Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyTim Scott to deliver GOP response to Biden's speech to Congress GOP state attorneys general urge Biden, Congress not to expand Supreme Court Pelosi: Jan. 6 commission must focus only on insurrection MORE (R-Calif.) hours after Democrats regained control of the lower chamber. 

"I plan to run for minority leader," Jordan told Hill.TV's Buck Sexton on "Rising." 

"In 2016, the American people elected Republicans to come here and change this town. I think the president is doing just that, but I don't think they see the same intensity from folks in Congress, folks in the House of Representatives," he continued. 

"Have we replaced ObamaCare yet? Have we secured the border yet? Have we reformed welfare yet? No we haven't," he said. 

Jordan went on to slam current GOP leadership in the House, saying they were not willing to engage in debate with Democrats. 

"Now that we're in the minority, that's about all we can do is debate, but fight hard in the debate for the principles, for the things that we know the American people sent us here to do in 2016. Show them that we deserve to be back in power in 2020," he said. 

Jordan's comments come hours after he won his reelection bid in Ohio's 4th Congressional District against Democrat Janet Garrett. 

Earlier this year, Jordan, a co-founder of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, announced his bid to replace Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanOn The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire Trump faces test of power with early endorsements Lobbying world MORE after the Wisconsin Republican announced his retirement. 

Jordan has been one of President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump: LeBron James's 'racist rants' are divisive, nasty North Carolina man accused of fraudulently obtaining .5M in PPP loans Biden announces picks to lead oceans, lands agencies MORE's staunchest allies on Capitol Hill, frequently slamming the Justice Department and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's probe into Russian election meddling, which Trump has called a "witch hunt." 

He and Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsBoehner finally calls it as he sees it Stephen Miller launching group to challenge Democrats' policies through lawsuits A year with the coronavirus: How we got here MORE (R-N.C.), the chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, introduced articles of impeachment earlier this year against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who is overseeing Mueller's probe. 

— Julia Manchester