Key House conservative not ‘optimistic’ about either immigration bill passing

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsGraham to renew call for second special counsel Hillicon Valley: Sanders finds perfect target in Amazon | Cyberattacks are new fear 17 years after 9/11 | Firm outs alleged British Airways hackers | Trump to target election interference with sanctions | Apple creating portal for police data requests Graham: Obama, not Trump, politicized DOJ and FBI MORE (R-N.C.), the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, said he is “not optimistic” that either immigration bill that the House is considering on Thursday will pass.

“I’m not optimistic about the two bills that will be on the floor today,” Meadows said Thursday in an interview with Hill.TV's "Rising." “I think at this point, the more conservative bill doesn’t get to 218. It’s still up in the air whether the more moderate bill gets to 218.”

“If I were to have to handicap it right now at this particular point this morning,” he added, “I would say no, it’s not.”

The House is scheduled to vote Thursday on a pair of competing immigration bills: a compromise measure that was negotiated by centrists and conservatives and a more hard-line measure from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteVirginia reps urge Trump to declare federal emergency ahead of Hurricane Florence Republicans mull new punishments for dissident lawmakers Republicans ready to grill Bruce Ohr as Trump-DOJ feud escalates MORE (R-Va.).

The compromise measure would provide a path to citizenship for so-called Dreamers who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, earmark $25 billion for President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE’s border wall and other security measures, and stop the separation of undocumented families at the border.

But many conservatives are balking at the compromise bill ahead of Thursday’s vote, fearful they’ll be attacked from the right if they back it. Conservative groups, including NumbersUSA and Heritage Action, are deriding the compromise bill as “amnesty” for providing a path to citizenship for up to 1.8 million Dreamers.

Meadows was seen in a heated argument with Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor Juan Williams: America warms up to socialism Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker MORE (R-Wis.) on the House floor on Wednesday. He was furious that the final immigration package left out several provisions that had been agreed to during earlier negotiations.

Conservatives are also upset that leadership is bringing the original version of the Goodlatte bill to the floor instead of a modified version.

Meadows noted on Thursday that some conservatives are reluctant to go out on a limb and support the compromise measure because the legislation would go nowhere in the Senate.

“There’s a lot of us willing to vote for this bill and maybe walk the plank, but it’s going nowhere in the Senate,” Meadows said. “I’m not even sure they’re going to bring it up.”

But Meadows did predict that Congress would act on a stand-alone fix to prevent children from being separated from their parents at the border, even though Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday to stop the controversial policy.

“I think ultimately, we’ve got to fix it legislatively,” Meadows said. “But I do believe a more narrow bill will pass the House and Senate.”

— Melanie Zanona