GOP lawmaker says evidence might have been tampered with in Flynn case

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsAre the legal walls closing in on Donald Trump? Jan. 6 probe roils Cheney race in Wyoming House has the power to subpoena its members — but does it have the will? MORE (R-N.C.) suggested Thursday in an interview wth Hill.TV's "Rising" that evidence may have been tampered with in the case against former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Meadows, the leader of the conservative House Freedom Caucus and a close ally of President TrumpDonald TrumpDeputy AG: DOJ investigating fake Trump electors Former Boston Red Sox star David Ortiz elected to Baseball Hall of Fame Overnight Health Care — Senators unveil pandemic prep overhaul MORE's, said he and other lawmakers are finding evidence of possible tampering, an allegation he previously made at a House hearing where Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz testified.

"Justice should be meted out evenly, and yet we’re finding that evidence could have been tampered with," Meadows said.

Meadows suggested one focus is whether FBI interview reports — known as 302 reports — about Flynn were altered to improve the chances he'd be prosecuted.

"I brought this up with the inspector general the other day.  Some of those key witness will be asked to appear before House Oversight," he added.

The question about the FBI interview reports, he said, was "were they changed to change the outcome of prosecution decisions. I think they might have."

"We’re not going to yield until we get an answer," he added.

It's unclear what evidence he has to support the tampering claim, as he has not presented it publicly.

Trump fired Flynn in February 2017 after a short time on the job. He said at the time it was because Flynn lied to Vice President Pence, and later indicated it had to do with Flynn lying to the FBI.

Flynn pleaded guilty in December to lying to the FBI as part of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerAn unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Senate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG MORE's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Meadows has been among the most vocal lawmakers in his criticism of the Justice Department and its handling of the Russia probe. He and other conservatives have eagerly pursued access to Justice Department documents.

While the conservative lawmakers have received thousands of documents from the agency, they say they have not been able to review key documents nor have they received as many documents as they've requested, leading to rising tensions between Republicans and federal officials.