RNC spokeswoman: ObamaCare repeal possible if GOP keeps House

Republicans could still repeal and replace ObamaCare if they are able to keep the House majority and gain seats in the Senate, Republican National Committee (RNC) spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany told Hill TV's "Rising" on Thursday.

McEnany specifically noted legislation proposed by GOP Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks This Thanksgiving, skip the political food fights and talk UFOs instead Biden move to tap oil reserves draws GOP pushback MORE (S.C.) and Bill CassidyBill CassidySunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variant emerges; supply chain issues and inflation persist Legislators look to expand health care access through telehealth, biosimilars Infrastructure deal is proof that Congress can still do good, bipartisan work MORE (La.), which was defeated last fall.

"We were a big proponent of Graham-Cassidy. That, of course, was the Senate bill that gave the states the power and allowed each state to select what the best way forward was for them on health care," McEnany told Hill TV's Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton on "Rising."

"That was one vote short, and if we maintain the House as we expect we will, pick up a few Senate seats, Graham-Cassidy can become a reality," she said.

Republicans, including President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer defense secretary Esper sues Pentagon in memoir dispute Biden celebrates start of Hanukkah Fauci says lies, threats are 'noise' MORE, campaigned heavily on repealing and replacing former President Obama's signature health-care law for years. 

Losing the congressional battle on ObamaCare was a disappointment for Trump, though he was able to win repeal of the individual insurance mandate through the GOP's tax-cut law.

Democrats hoping to win back the House hope to focus their arguments this fall on health care. They think the GOP's efforts to repeal ObamaCare backfired politically on Republicans. 

The Graham-Cassidy bill would have given states $500 billion of federal block grants over 10 years to either repeal, repair or keep their ObamaCare programs. 

Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks On The Money — Biden sticks with Powell despite pressure Senators call for Smithsonian Latino, women's museums to be built on National Mall MORE (R-Maine), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP senators appalled by 'ridiculous' House infighting MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace, Chris Christie battle over Fox News Trump's attacks on McConnell seen as prelude to 2024 White House bid MORE (R-Ariz.), and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulFauci says lies, threats are 'noise' Fauci overwhelmed by calls after journal published mistake over beagle experiments McConnell looks for way out of debt ceiling box MORE (R-Ky.) broke with their party and killed the repeal effort last September. 

— Julia Manchester