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RNC spokeswoman: ObamaCare repeal possible if GOP keeps House

Republicans could still repeal and replace ObamaCare if they are able to keep the House majority and gain seats in the Senate, Republican National Committee (RNC) spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany told Hill TV's "Rising" on Thursday.

McEnany specifically noted legislation proposed by GOP Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamFeinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Media and Hollywood should stop their marching-to-Georgia talk MORE (S.C.) and Bill CassidyBill CassidyBottom line Loeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus MORE (La.), which was defeated last fall.

"We were a big proponent of Graham-Cassidy. That, of course, was the Senate bill that gave the states the power and allowed each state to select what the best way forward was for them on health care," McEnany told Hill TV's Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton on "Rising."

"That was one vote short, and if we maintain the House as we expect we will, pick up a few Senate seats, Graham-Cassidy can become a reality," she said.

Republicans, including President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Trump's remaking of the judicial system Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit MORE, campaigned heavily on repealing and replacing former President Obama's signature health-care law for years. 

Losing the congressional battle on ObamaCare was a disappointment for Trump, though he was able to win repeal of the individual insurance mandate through the GOP's tax-cut law.

Democrats hoping to win back the House hope to focus their arguments this fall on health care. They think the GOP's efforts to repeal ObamaCare backfired politically on Republicans. 

The Graham-Cassidy bill would have given states $500 billion of federal block grants over 10 years to either repeal, repair or keep their ObamaCare programs. 

Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsWhoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Team Trump offering 'fire hose' of conspiracy Kool-Aid for supporters MORE (R-Maine), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Obama's dire warnings about right-wing media Democrats' squabbling vindicates Biden non-campaign McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol MORE (R-Ariz.), and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Overnight Defense: Formal negotiations inch forward on defense bill with Confederate base name language | Senators look to block B UAE arms sales | Trump administration imposes Iran sanctions over human rights abuses MORE (R-Ky.) broke with their party and killed the repeal effort last September. 

— Julia Manchester