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RNC spokeswoman: ObamaCare repeal possible if GOP keeps House

Republicans could still repeal and replace ObamaCare if they are able to keep the House majority and gain seats in the Senate, Republican National Committee (RNC) spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany told Hill TV's "Rising" on Thursday.

McEnany specifically noted legislation proposed by GOP Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMSNBC's Joy Reid pans Manchin, Sinema as the 'no progress caucus' Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike MORE (S.C.) and Bill CassidyBill CassidyCalls grow for national paid family leave amid pandemic Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats Vivek Murthy confirmed as surgeon general MORE (La.), which was defeated last fall.

"We were a big proponent of Graham-Cassidy. That, of course, was the Senate bill that gave the states the power and allowed each state to select what the best way forward was for them on health care," McEnany told Hill TV's Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton on "Rising."

"That was one vote short, and if we maintain the House as we expect we will, pick up a few Senate seats, Graham-Cassidy can become a reality," she said.

Republicans, including President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump: McConnell 'helpless' to stop Biden from packing court Romney on NRSC awarding Trump: Not 'my preference' McConnell sidesteps Trump calling him 'dumb son of a b----' MORE, campaigned heavily on repealing and replacing former President Obama's signature health-care law for years. 

Losing the congressional battle on ObamaCare was a disappointment for Trump, though he was able to win repeal of the individual insurance mandate through the GOP's tax-cut law.

Democrats hoping to win back the House hope to focus their arguments this fall on health care. They think the GOP's efforts to repeal ObamaCare backfired politically on Republicans. 

The Graham-Cassidy bill would have given states $500 billion of federal block grants over 10 years to either repeal, repair or keep their ObamaCare programs. 

Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsAgainst mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan Trump's early endorsements reveal GOP rift The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (R-Maine), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSylvester Stallone reportedly joins Trump's Mar-a-Lago The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden meets with bipartisan lawmakers for infrastructure negotiations Cindy McCain to be named Biden ambassador to UN program: report MORE (R-Ariz.), and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCharles Booker launches exploratory committee to consider challenge to Rand Paul Rand Paul calls Fauci a 'petty tyrant' Biden picks vocal Trump critics to lead immigration agencies MORE (R-Ky.) broke with their party and killed the repeal effort last September. 

— Julia Manchester