Midwest Dem candidate: Farm aid plan like getting 'punched in the face' 

One Midwest Democratic House candidate said he isn’t impressed with President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE’s $12 billion farm aid plan.

J.D. Scholten (D-Iowa) told Hill.TV that farmers in his district are still reeling from the impact of Trump’s trade tariffs.

“When it came out this week about the $12 billion – it’s like if you get punched in the face and then you get an ice pack,” Scholten told co-host Krystal Ball on “Rising.”

Scholten said farmers were struggling even before Trump took a hardline stance on trade policies, pointing to what he sees as a larger, underlying systemic problem that plagues the agriculture industry.

“Farmers have had a lot of anxiety before it even came to the tariffs…we need to get into more markets,” Scholten said.

“Right now, I see a lot of farmers, they don’t really know what to think – they’re worried about this year’s harvest," Scholten told Hill.TV. "The pork producers and dairy folks, they’re getting hit right now.”

Scholten is running against Iowa’s fourth district incumbent, Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingSteve King defends remarks on rape, incest The Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters Steve King says 'left-wing media' and GOP leadership owe him apology after rape, incest comments MORE (R), who represents the largest farm district in the state.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny PerdueGeorge (Sonny) Ervin Perdue70 mayors sign letter opposing Trump proposal that would restrict access to food stamps USDA eases relocation timeline as researchers flee agency The Hill's Morning Report - How will Trump be received in Dayton and El Paso? MORE unveiled the aid plan on Tuesday, calling it a short-term fix intended to provide "time to work on long-term trade deals."

The newly proposed package was met with criticism from midwestern lawmakers from both sides of the aisle.

Republican Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseIt's time to empower military families with education freedom Bipartisan panel to issue recommendations for defending US against cyberattacks early next year The Hill's Morning Report - Trump lauds tariffs on China while backtracking from more MORE (Neb.) said in a statement that America’s farmers don’t want to be paid to lose — they want to win by feeding the world.”

On Wednesday, Trump pleaded with farmers to “be a little patient” and claimed that farmers would “be the biggest beneficiary” of his trade policies.

— Tess Bonn