Number of GOP women in House could fall to World War II levels, Republican CEO says

Republican strategist and CEO Sarah Chamberlain said in an interview that aired Friday on "Rising" that the number of GOP women in the House will decline in November's midterms, falling to World War II levels. 

"Unfortunately, yes," Chamberlain told Hill.TV's Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton when asked whether there will be fewer women in the Republican caucus after the midterms.

"But some of our women will be moving up, hopefully to the Senate, to the governors' seats, but yeah we will be short," she continued. 

"We're going to be at World War II levels for GOP women in the House, which we intend to work on fixing in 2020," she said. 

Chamberlain is the CEO of Republican Mainstreet Partnership and is the only woman in the U.S. serving as the CEO of a major GOP organization. 

Only 36 women joined Congress for the first time between 1935 and 1954, according to the House's archive website.

Only five Republican women served in the 77th Congress from 1941 to 1943, while six Republican women served in the 78th Congress. 

There are currently 29 Republican women and 78 Democratic women serving in Congress. 

Chamberlain's comments come as scores of Democratic women run for office across the country, while Republican women are running in smaller numbers. 

There are currently 15 Democratic women running in Senate races, while there are 8 Republican women running, according to Rutgers University's Center for American Women and Politics.
 
Democrats have 187 women running in House races, compared to 52 Republicans running. 
 
However, there are high profile Republican women serving in Congress and running for reelection. 
 
"I think [Rep.] Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP congresswoman says she opted out of NRCC run because McCarthy had 'a different plan' Democratic strategist says GOP needs ‘exorcism’ after House midterm losses Stefanik: GOP leaders need to step up their female recruitment efforts MORE [R-N.Y.] has a bright future ahead of her," Chamberlain said. "Elise is wonderful. She's very bright. The men in the GOP respect her a great deal, which is important. 
 
"I think also Mia Love has the potential of also being a leading woman, and then there's a few older women like [Rep.] Susan Brookes [R-In.], who are fantastic."
 

— Julia Manchester