Hillary Clinton made rural voters feel 'ashamed,' says former Boston Globe editor

Former Boston Globe editor Ben Bradlee Jr. said in an interview that aired Tuesday on "Rising" that 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy The ideological divide on vaping has a clear winner: Smokers Biden struggles to hit it off with millennials MORE made white, working-class voters feel "ashamed" during the campaign. 

"I think [President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE's] appeal was more cultural than economic. People in that county [Luzerne County, Pa.] and many parts of the country felt disenfranchised, felt forgotten, ignored and dominated by a liberal culture that mocked their faith, mocked their patriotism," Bradlee, the son of late Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee, told Hill.TV's Krystal Ball earlier this month. 

Clinton notably lost regular Rust Belt Democratic strongholds in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

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"They felt heard by Trump whereas they felt that the Democratic Party had largely left them. They say people fall in love with their therapist because they feel listened to, and I think they felt listened to by Trump," he continued. 

"Hillary made them feel ashamed by calling them deplorables and things like that, which didn't go over too well," he said. 

Bradlee is promoting his book, "The Forgotten: How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America," which details how Trump was able to flip Luzerne County from blue to red in 2016. 

Clinton received backlash during the campaign after she said that half of Trump's supporters could be put into a "basket of deplorables."

The Trump campaign seized on the comment, saying it demonstrated Clinton was largely out of touch with voters. 

Trump was able to appeal to the white working class in the traditionally Democratic states, propelling him to electoral victory. According to media exit poll data, he increased the Republican vote percentage in rural and small-town areas by 11 points compared to the party's 2012 presidential nominee, Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRomney: 'Putin and Kim Jong Un deserve a censure rather than flattery' A US-UK free trade agreement can hold the Kremlin to account Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity MORE.

— Julia Manchester