Trump Jr. warns GOP ahead of midterms, 'It could all go away tomorrow'

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump Jr.'s India trip cost taxpayers nearly 0K: report Social media explodes over Avenatti arrest Mueller targets Stone in final push MORE warned Republican voters in an interview that aired Wednesday on "Rising" that Democrats will work to undo President TrumpDonald John TrumpMia Love pulls ahead in Utah race as judge dismisses her lawsuit Trump administration denies exploring extradition of Erdoğan foe for Turkey Trump congratulates Kemp, says Abrams will have 'terrific political future' MORE's agenda if they make gains November's midterm elections. 

"It could all go away tomorrow, and that's what they have to realize," the president's oldest son told Hill.TV's Buck Sexton on Tuesday. 

"The left, their plan isn't just to change things a little bit, it's to do the exact opposite of everything Donald Trump has been doing. The tax reform, everything that has allowed this economy to thrive. Everything that has allowed there to be the all-time lowest African-American unemployment numbers, the all-time lowest Hispanic unemployment numbers, the all-time lowest female unemployment [numbers]," he continued. 

"Every economic metric that we are winning right now, every metric that is so much better than it was a couple years ago, that could all go away," he said. "The one problem I think we had on the GOP side was that they were fat and happy. They'd gotten everything they wanted. There wasn't that urgency. People have to realize that it can all go away, and that's what the left wants to do." 

Trump has fulfilled a series of campaign promises since taking office nearly two years ago, including passing tax reform, appointing conservative judges and renegotiating the North American Free Trade agreement. 

Recent polling suggests that both Democrats and Republican are more fired up about voting in the midterms just a few weeks out from Election Day. 

A Washington Post/ABC News poll released on Sunday found that 81 percent of Democratic voters said they were enthusiastic about voting, while 79 percent of Republican voters said the same. 

— Julia Manchester