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Blue wave crashed into Trump tsunami, giving America exactly what it wants

By John Solomon
Opinion Contributor

Two election waves — one blue, the other Trumpian — collided on Tuesday night and left the electorate with a split decision that defies history and further exposes the tale of two Americas.

Democrats won control of the House they so coveted, giving them a check on   Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Sunday shows preview: US health officials brace for post-holiday COVID-19 surge MORE's hold on Washington and a platform for relentless investigation of their arch nemesis.

But the blue wave Democrats so ferociously sought to build, with record fundraising and relentless Hollywood celebrity endorsements, crashed right into the Trump tsunami we discovered in 2016, which has not yet crested.

As a result, Republicans picked up at least three — it could be as many as five — extra seats in the Senate, expanding their majority in an election in which history almost always imposes losses for the party controlling the White House.

The GOP was poised to hold three of the most cherished statehouses for the 2020 election — Florida, Ohio and Iowa — which will give the party a key advantage when redistricting begins.

And without much fanfare, Republican chief executives in Northeast — once declared as extinct as the T-rex — continued a steady comeback, as popular GOP governors in traditionally Democratic Maryland, Massachusetts and Vermont won reelection and were joined by fellow Republican Chris Sununu in New Hampshire.

So what does one make from this muddled election that gave us both Gov.-elect Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump, Biden clash over transition holdup, pandemic plans Group of Florida mayors calls on DeSantis to issue mask mandate DeSantis promises to keep Florida open despite recent coronavirus case surge MORE, the Trump protege in Florida, and likely House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiClub for Growth to launch ad blitz in Georgia to juice GOP turnout Governors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight MORE, the bastion of California liberalism?

First, it means America wants some form of divided government when it sees a powerful chief executive, even if they are happy with the economy he has revived.

Second, it means we still have two distinct American electorates, a division first exposed in the 2010 election that gave rise to the Tea Party and then reaffirmed in the 2016 election that dumped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGroups seek to get Black vote out for Democrats in Georgia runoffs Biden's political position is tougher than Trump's Valadao unseats Cox in election rematch MORE for a brasher New Yorker.

The blue faction favors college graduates, suburban moms, millennials, minorities and power urban centers like Manhattan, Hollywood and Seattle. It gets riled by Trump's bad-boy act and stretches to help immigrants — legal or not — along with transgenders, the environment and other progressive causes.

It was those forces that unseated GOP Congressman Dave Brat from a deep-red House seat near Richmond, Va., and kept Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach from claiming the statehouse in perennially red Kansas.

The red segment gathers its strength from those who did not graduate from college, blue-collar white males, evangelicals, Second Amendment adherents and Southerners, all of whom see Trump as someone willing to fight to preserve a way of life that they consider to be under attack from liberal elitists.

The latter saved Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFormer CIA head, Cruz trade jabs over killing of Iranian nuclear scientist: 'You are unworthy to represent the good people of Texas' O'Brien on 2024 talk: 'There's all kinds of speculation out there' Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation MORE from rising-star Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeMexican president breaks with other world leaders, refusing to acknowledge Biden win until election is finalized Mexico emerging as foreign policy challenge for Biden Beyoncé sports pro-Biden mask on Instagram MORE in Texas, kept Andrew Gillum from the statehouse in Florida, and ousted Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocrats must turn around Utah police arrest man driving 130 mph claiming he was going to kill former Missouri senator McCaskill congratulates Hawley on birth of daughter MORE from Missouri's U.S. Senate seat.

These two forces are poised to clash again in two years. And both sides should take note about battle lines that emerged Tuesday night.

Democrats will have a hard time winning statewide races in Middle America states if their candidates propose increased taxes or push for open borders. And they need to find a message in the immigration debate that doesn't cast those who oppose open borders as racist bigots when, in fact, issues of fairness and security weigh heavily.

And Republicans should learn the Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members House adjusts format for dinner with new members after criticism Former GOP congressman calls for Biden to receive presidential briefings MORE rule: The Florida Republican from Miami got dumped after running from Trump. Republicans can't run from their president in 2020.

Finally, Republicans learned in House races where health care played big that they don't have a message to counter an increasingly popular Medicare-for-all prescription. They’d better get one before the next election.

John Solomon is an award-winning investigative journalist whose work over the years has exposed U.S. and FBI intelligence failures before the Sept. 11 attacks, federal scientists’ misuse of foster children and veterans in drug experiments, and numerous cases of political corruption. He is The Hill’s executive vice president for video.