Kuwaiti ambassador says he is 'optimistic' about Mideast peace plan

The Kuwaiti ambassador to the U.S., Salem Abdullah Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, said in an interview that aired Wednesday on "Rising" that he was optimistic the Trump administration will come forward with more proposals for peace in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 

"The Palestinian issue is a very, very serious issue that needs to be solved in the Middle East. I'm not saying that all problems in the Middle East emanate from that, but I think if you can find a just solution for the Palestinian issue, I think that will radiate around the region, and we can get a lot of peaceful, good stuff going in the Middle East," the ambassador told Hill.TV's John Solomon on Tuesday. 

"We're very optimistic that maybe the Trump administration will come forward with some good ideas and just ideas, I mean the ideas have to be fair and just to resolve this 70 year-old problem," he continued. 

The ambassador's comments come after Israel's ambassador to the United Nations Danny Danon said on Tuesday that the U.S. expects to release its Mideast peace plan in early 2019. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem senator says Zelensky was 'feeling the pressure' to probe Bidens 2020 Dems slam Trump decision on West Bank settlements Trump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' MORE's son-in-law Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerUN pushes back on US reversal on Israeli settlements Pompeo announces Israeli settlements do not violate international law Trump to tour Apple factory with Tim Cook on Wednesday MORE, along with the administration's Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt, are among those drafting the plan. 

Trump expressed a desire for reaching a peace agreement between Israel and Palestinians on the 2016 campaign trail, calling it the “ultimate deal.”

But Palestinians have criticized many of the president's policies such as moving the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

"We've heard of the deal of the century, but honestly we haven't seen anything of that deal. I can understand that the administration wants to keep its cards close to its chest, but I hope in the not distant future we'll be able to get to understand what's in that deal," the ambassador said. 

— Julia Manchester