Meadows says Comey's interview with House Republicans will be 'far reaching'

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsLawmakers grill Census Bureau officials after report on cybersecurity issues Conservative lawmakers warn Pelosi about 'rate-setting' surprise billing fix House GOP leader says reassignment of Vindman was appropriate MORE (R-N.C.) said in an interview that aired Friday on "Rising" that former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyBill Barr is trying his best to be Trump's Roy Cohn Comey responds to Trump with Mariah Carey gif: 'Why are you so obsessed with me?' Trump punts on Stone pardon decision after sentencing MORE's interview with House Republicans will be "far-reaching." 

"I don't want to pass a guilty verdict along until we've had the chance to hear from Director Comey," Meadows told Hill.TV's Molly Hooper. 

"But I can say this, the questions will be very far-reaching and probe very deep, not only within email chains that he's had but conversations that have been represented that he has been a party to," the Freedom Caucus chairman continued. 

Meadows's comments come as House Republicans are set to question Comey about allegations of bias within the Justice Department during the 2016 presidential election in regard to Russia's election interference and former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSchiff blasts Trump for making 'false claims' about Russia intel: 'You've betrayed America. Again.' The problem with Trump's Middle East peace plan Trump's Intel moves spark Democratic fury MORE's email server. 

The interview will be one of the last chances House Republicans have to probe the allegations before Democrats formally take over the majority in the House. 

Comey has battled with House Republicans since House Judiciary Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteUSCIS chief Cuccinelli blames Paul Ryan for immigration inaction Immigrant advocacy groups shouldn't be opposing Trump's raids Top Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview MORE (R-Va.) subpoenaed the former FBI director, ordering him to testify behind closed doors. 

The former FBI director argued that testimony behind closed doors would lead to selective leaks that would fit their “corrosive narrative” of FBI bias against Trump. 

House Republicans and Comey eventually struck a deal, agreeing that he would testify before closed doors with a transcript of the interview released within 24 hours of the interview wrapping up. 

— Julia Manchester