Meadows says Comey's interview with House Republicans will be 'far reaching'

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller aftermath: What will House Dems do now? Mueller report poses new test for Dems Washington in frenzy over release of Mueller report MORE (R-N.C.) said in an interview that aired Friday on "Rising" that former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report April Ryan slams Mike Huckabee in Twitter feud: 'Will you get into heaven? The answer is no!' MORE's interview with House Republicans will be "far-reaching." 

"I don't want to pass a guilty verdict along until we've had the chance to hear from Director Comey," Meadows told Hill.TV's Molly Hooper. 

"But I can say this, the questions will be very far-reaching and probe very deep, not only within email chains that he's had but conversations that have been represented that he has been a party to," the Freedom Caucus chairman continued. 

Meadows's comments come as House Republicans are set to question Comey about allegations of bias within the Justice Department during the 2016 presidential election in regard to Russia's election interference and former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report MORE's email server. 

The interview will be one of the last chances House Republicans have to probe the allegations before Democrats formally take over the majority in the House. 

Comey has battled with House Republicans since House Judiciary Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTop Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview It’s time for Congress to pass an anti-cruelty statute DOJ opinion will help protect kids from dangers of online gambling MORE (R-Va.) subpoenaed the former FBI director, ordering him to testify behind closed doors. 

The former FBI director argued that testimony behind closed doors would lead to selective leaks that would fit their “corrosive narrative” of FBI bias against Trump. 

House Republicans and Comey eventually struck a deal, agreeing that he would testify before closed doors with a transcript of the interview released within 24 hours of the interview wrapping up. 

— Julia Manchester