Meadows says 'too early to tell' if special House election should be held in North Carolina

North Carolina Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — Sparks fly as House Judiciary debates impeachment articles Democrats object to Meadows passing note to Jordan from dais Meadows says he's advocating for Trump to add Alan Dershowitz to impeachment defense team MORE (R) said in an interview that aired Friday on "Rising" that it is too early to suggest that there should be a special election in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District. 

"I think it's too early to tell whether there should be a special election," Meadows told Hill.TV's Molly Hooper on Thursday.

"There are probably things that go on in every election that don't affect the outcome. For example, somebody voting in a wrong precinct," he continued. 

"If there is fraud that has gone on that has affected the outcome of the election, then certainly a new election would be appropriate. That being said, it's way too early to suggest that," he said. 

Controversy has rocked the House race after multiple voters came forward with sworn statements saying their absentee ballots were hand-collected by canvassers, which is not allowed in North Carolina. 

Mark HarrisMark HarrisBevin says he lost because liberals are 'good at harvesting votes' in urban areas The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate Why my American Indian tribe voted Republican in NC's special election MORE, the Republican candidate in the race, leads Democrat Dan McCready by 905 votes, but the results have not been certified. 

The state board of elections cited "irregularities" and is set to hold an evidentiary hearing on Dec. 21.

Various top Republicans including President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE have declined to comment on the issue. 

The Washington Post reported that Sens. Marco Rubio (Fl.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Rand Paul (Ky.) all declined to comment on the issue because they said they were not informed enough. 

However, Democrats have voiced their concerns about the election, with some calling for a do-over. 

Incoming majority whip Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) called for the election to be redone, "all the way back to the primary.”

— Julia Manchester