Meadows says 'too early to tell' if special House election should be held in North Carolina

North Carolina Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsClarence Thomas, Joe Manchin, Rudy Giuliani among guests at second state visit under Trump The Hill Interview: Sanford says Trump GOP doing 'serious brand destruction' GOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan MORE (R) said in an interview that aired Friday on "Rising" that it is too early to suggest that there should be a special election in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District. 

"I think it's too early to tell whether there should be a special election," Meadows told Hill.TV's Molly Hooper on Thursday.

"There are probably things that go on in every election that don't affect the outcome. For example, somebody voting in a wrong precinct," he continued. 

"If there is fraud that has gone on that has affected the outcome of the election, then certainly a new election would be appropriate. That being said, it's way too early to suggest that," he said. 

Controversy has rocked the House race after multiple voters came forward with sworn statements saying their absentee ballots were hand-collected by canvassers, which is not allowed in North Carolina. 

Mark HarrisMark HarrisThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate Why my American Indian tribe voted Republican in NC's special election North Carolina race raises 2020 red flags for Republicans, Democrats MORE, the Republican candidate in the race, leads Democrat Dan McCready by 905 votes, but the results have not been certified. 

The state board of elections cited "irregularities" and is set to hold an evidentiary hearing on Dec. 21.

Various top Republicans including President TrumpDonald John TrumpJulián Castro: It's time for House Democrats to 'do something' about Trump Warren: Congress is 'complicit' with Trump 'by failing to act' Sanders to join teachers, auto workers striking in Midwest MORE have declined to comment on the issue. 

The Washington Post reported that Sens. Marco Rubio (Fl.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Rand Paul (Ky.) all declined to comment on the issue because they said they were not informed enough. 

However, Democrats have voiced their concerns about the election, with some calling for a do-over. 

Incoming majority whip Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) called for the election to be redone, "all the way back to the primary.”

— Julia Manchester