Former FBI official says Mueller won’t be ‘colored by politics’ in Russia probe

Former FBI official Kevin Brock on Thursday said that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE is unbiased and won't be “colored by politics” in his ongoing Russia investigation, citing his personal working experience with the former FBI director.

“In my personal dealings with him, I’ve never heard him utter a word in any situation — I’ve been in many, many meetings, even in hallway conversations — [that] gave any indication of what his political leanings were or any biases or anything like that,” Brock, who served as a former assistant director of intelligence at the FBI for 23 years, told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball.

“The man is a prosecutor, that’s what he does. If he sees an opportunity to bring somebody to justice — he’s going to do that and it’s not going to be colored by politics,” he continued.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE has repeatedly lashed out at Mueller, calling his investigation into Russian election interference and possible collusion between Moscow and the Trump campaign a “witch hunt” and a “hoax.” 

Trump in November claimed that Mueller was “a conflicted prosecutor gone rogue” who was doing “TREMENDOUS damage” to the criminal justice system.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have called for legislation that would safeguard Mueller and his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

In April, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamWhite House won't move forward with billions in foreign aid cuts GOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Cindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death MORE (R-S.C.) co-sponsored a bill with Sens. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Biden faces scrutiny for his age from other Democrats Democrats press FBI for details on Kavanaugh investigation MORE (D-Del.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSteyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates Gabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch MORE (D-N.J.) to protect Mueller. The bill would essentially codify Department of Justice regulations that say a special counsel can only be fired by a senior official and would give them the ability to challenge their firing in court.

Even though the bipartisan legislation was overwhelmingly approved by the Judiciary Committee, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' Pelosi asks Democrats for 'leverage' on impeachment Democrats press FBI, DHS on response to white supremacist violence MORE (R-Ky.) has blocked the bill from reaching the Senate floor. 

McConnell argues that such a bill is “not necessary” because he doesn’t believe Trump would ever fire Mueller.

– Tess Bonn