Former FBI official says Mueller won’t be ‘colored by politics’ in Russia probe

Former FBI official Kevin Brock on Thursday said that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE is unbiased and won't be “colored by politics” in his ongoing Russia investigation, citing his personal working experience with the former FBI director.

“In my personal dealings with him, I’ve never heard him utter a word in any situation — I’ve been in many, many meetings, even in hallway conversations — [that] gave any indication of what his political leanings were or any biases or anything like that,” Brock, who served as a former assistant director of intelligence at the FBI for 23 years, told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball.

“The man is a prosecutor, that’s what he does. If he sees an opportunity to bring somebody to justice — he’s going to do that and it’s not going to be colored by politics,” he continued.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Camerota clashes with Trump's immigration head over president's tweet LA Times editorial board labels Trump 'Bigot-in-Chief' Trump complains of 'fake polls' after surveys show him trailing multiple Democratic candidates MORE has repeatedly lashed out at Mueller, calling his investigation into Russian election interference and possible collusion between Moscow and the Trump campaign a “witch hunt” and a “hoax.” 

Trump in November claimed that Mueller was “a conflicted prosecutor gone rogue” who was doing “TREMENDOUS damage” to the criminal justice system.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have called for legislation that would safeguard Mueller and his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

In April, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump shares Graham quote calling Ocasio-Cortez 'anti-America' Graham: Trump should focus on policy, not personal attacks The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke MORE (R-S.C.) co-sponsored a bill with Sens. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand Senate Democrats skipping Pence's border trip GOP chairman introduces bill to force 'comprehensive review' of US-Saudi relationship MORE (D-Del.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker prison reform bill would give older prisoners a 'second look' Booker to unveil plan for older Americans' long-term health care: report Judd Gregg: Counting the costs of Democrats' desires MORE (D-N.J.) to protect Mueller. The bill would essentially codify Department of Justice regulations that say a special counsel can only be fired by a senior official and would give them the ability to challenge their firing in court.

Even though the bipartisan legislation was overwhelmingly approved by the Judiciary Committee, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWhat Democrats should say about guns This week: House Dems voting to hold Barr, Ross in contempt Juan Williams: GOP in a panic over Mueller MORE (R-Ky.) has blocked the bill from reaching the Senate floor. 

McConnell argues that such a bill is “not necessary” because he doesn’t believe Trump would ever fire Mueller.

– Tess Bonn