Attorney says more undocumented workers are employed at Trump golf course

The attorney representing five immigrant women who worked at President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'Haven't thought about' pardons for Mueller target Pence: Rocket attack 'proves that Hamas is not a partner for peace' Conservation remains a core conservative principle MORE's New Jersey golf club said in an interview that aired Wednesday on "Rising" that he has reason to believe more undocumented workers are employed at the club. 

"It's my understanding based on what my clients have said, they have friends who also work there," Anibal Romero told Hill.TV's Krystal Ball on Monday. "We're talking about a very high number of employees at the golf club who were not documented, who were also brought in to work there, who may share similar stories."

"A very large number of people who have worked there in the past, and we believe that this time there about 12 or 13 people who are still working there. We haven't heard from them," he continued. 

Romero's comments come after The New York Times profiled Victorina Morales, who reportedly crossed the border illegally in 1999 and was hired at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., in 2013.

Morales said she used “phony” immigration papers to secure employment. 

The profile comes as the Trump administration continues to make cracking down on illegal immigration a top priority. 

Hill.TV has reached out to the Trump Organization for comment. 

The Trump Organization told The Hill earlier this month after Morales's profile was published that "if an employee submitted false documentation in an attempt to circumvent the law, they will be terminated immediately.”

However, Romero maintained on Wednesday that the golf club knew who they were hiring.

"In the case of my clients, they were recruited to come work for the golf club and management there knew who they were hiring," Romero said. "But assuming they didn't know, there's a document called the I-9, this document is obviously prepared by the employee, but if they were to follow E-Verify, they would probably understand that these women were not authorized to work legally in the United States." 

"That was not the case here though, because in this case, the women were brought on to work knowing that they did not have legal status in the United States," he said. 

— Julia Manchester