House Budget chair: Border funding in exchange for Dreamers' protections 'an easy deal to make'

New House Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthPelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power GOP, White House struggle to unite behind COVID-19 relief House seeks ways to honor John Lewis MORE (D-Ky.) said on Friday that some amount of money for border security in exchange for legal protections for Dreamers, or young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children, could be the way to agreement for Democrats and Republicans to end the ongoing partial government shutdown. 

"There's a lot of pride right now that's probably adversely affecting a settlement on both sides, and nobody wants to cave," Yarmuth told Hill.TV's Buck Sexton and Krystal Ball on "Rising." 

"But I think a deal where there's at least temporary working permits for Dreamers for several years, that kind of a relationship if you're not going to solve the Dreamer problem for us, some amount of money for border security is an easy deal to make," he continued. 

Yarmuth's comments come as Democrats and Republicans dig their heels in on the issue of President TrumpDonald John TrumpCensus Bureau intends to wrap up count on Oct. 5 despite judge's order Top House Republican calls for probe of source of NYT Trump tax documents New Yorkers report receiving ballots with wrong name, voter addresses MORE's proposed border wall as the partial government shutdown nears the end of its second week. 

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSupreme Court fight should drive Democrats and help Biden Graham to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick on Tuesday Democratic super PAC launches .5M ad campaign against Graham MORE (R-S.C.), an ally of the president's, floated a concession to Trump this week that would involve wedding border funding to work permits for Dreamers. 

Graham said Trump signaled he was open to the idea, but Republicans on Capitol Hill have appeared to show little interest. 

Democratic activists have signaled to congressional leaders that they will face backlash from the party's base if they compromise with Trump on border barriers without getting a major concession in return.

However, Democrats have not indicated they will concede any funding for the border wall. 

The new Democratic-controlled House on Thursday passed legislation to put an end to the shutdown, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said the measure would be dead on arrival in the Senate because it does not include Trump's demanded $5 billion in border wall funding. 

Trump on Friday sent a letter to lawmakers in both parties demanding a border wall ahead of talks with congressional leaders. 

“Walls work,” Trump wrote. “That’s why rich, powerful, and successful people build them around their homes. All Americans deserve the same protection.”

— Julia Manchester