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Graham: Trump's AG nominee Barr will let Mueller probe finish

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBiden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country The Memo: Harris moves signal broad role as VP Former US attorney asks for probe of allegations Graham pressured Georgia official MORE (R-S.C.) said Wednesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE's nominee for attorney general, William Barr, has committed to allowing special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerBarr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting MORE to "complete his job."

Graham, the incoming chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee that will be responsible for advancing Barr's nomination in the upper chamber, made the comments after meeting with Barr inside his Senate office building.

Barr “has a very high opinion of Mr. Mueller and is committed to seeing Mr. Mueller complete his job,” Graham told reporters moments after the meeting.

Graham said that Barr also told him that he had spoken with Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump turns his ire toward Cabinet members Ex-deputy attorney general says Justice Dept. 'will ignore' Trump's threats against political rivals The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House MORE, who informed Barr that "two years would probably be enough.”

Reports emerged Wednesday that Rosenstein, who has overseen the Russia probe since May 2017, is expected to leave the Justice Department within weeks, following the confirmation of Barr as attorney general.

Asked if he was concerned that Rosenstein plans to leave the DOJ upon Barr’s confirmation, Graham replied tersely “no.”

Trump's attorney general nominee is making the rounds on Capitol Hill this week ahead of his confirmation hearing on Jan. 15. Trump nominated Barr after ousting Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTime to bring federal employees home for every holiday Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Tuberville incorrectly says Gore was president-elect in 2000 MORE from the post in November.

At least one Democratic lawmaker is concerned with Rosenstein‘s apparent pending departure from the Justice Department.

“I’m concerned about it because I've seen him as a reliable, steady public servant that understands his job and is willing to do [it] regardless of political pressure," Rep. Dan KildeeDaniel (Dan) Timothy KildeeDemocrats to determine leaders after disappointing election Lawmakers fear voter backlash over failure to reach COVID-19 relief deal Democrats set to hold out for big police reform MORE (D-Mich.) told. Hill.TV.

"Obviously since he's no longer been able to ... directly oversee this investigation, that is a problem unto itself. I understand he may feel it is time for him to move on, but any time we see some of these career public servants that have clearly done their duty absent of the politics of the moment, any time we see these folks leaving government raises a lot of concern because we wonder who is going to be there to say no when somebody has to say no. He was one of those people and if he's not there that increases our anxiety.”

— Molly Hooper