Conservative leader Meadows condemns King comments 'in strongest sense'

GOP lawmakers are lining up to berate Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingWith surge in anti-Semitism, political leaders need to be aggressive and reflective in response Steve King challenger: 2020 Democrats have 'huge' opportunity to win over rural America Author sues NY Times after it calls him a 'white nationalist' MORE (R-Iowa) for comments he made last week regarding white nationalism and white supremacy.

The latest is conservative GOP lawmaker Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsRepublicans criticize Pelosi for gifting pens used to sign impeachment articles Trump, Democrats set for brawl on Iran war powers Overnight Defense: Iran crisis eases as Trump says Tehran 'standing down' | Dems unconvinced on evidence behind Soleimani strike | House sets Thursday vote on Iran war powers MORE (N.C.), who previously served on the Judiciary panel with King and leads the House Freedom Caucus.

"Candidly those kind of remarks are not something that our should be condoned and certainly should be condemned. And I do in the strongest sense. And so at this point – it's up to the voters of Iowa to determine Steve King's fate,” Meadows told Hill.TV.

The House in a nearly unanimous vote passed a resolution condemning white nationalism and white supremacy on Tuesday, amid the controversy over King. It does not specifically rebuke King, but follows his comments to the New York Times in an article published last Thursday.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked in the interview.

Late Monday, Romney - a freshman Utah senator and the former 2012 GOP presidential contender - called for King to resign over the comments.

A handful of other GOP officials including Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Democrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Iran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner MORE (R-Ky.) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial The Hill's 12:30 Report: Senate receives impeachment articles as trial opens MORE (Wyo.) also said King should look for a new job.

Late Monday, House Republicans on the Steering Committee refused to appoint King to any committee assignments.

The top-ranking GOP lawmaker on the Agriculture Committee, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayLive coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing Laughter erupts at hearing after Democrat fires back: Trump 'has 5 Pinocchios on a daily basis' Live coverage: Schiff closes with speech highlighting claims of Trump's corruption MORE (Texas), who worked alongside King on that panel, explained that denying King a committee seat makes it more difficult to pass legislation.

But Conaway stopped short of saying King should resign.

"That's up to him and the voters in his district to decide that – were taking the steps that I think are appropriate for our for our side and we'll see what Steve does with this new reality he's in," he said.

Democratic lawmakers are also calling for King's resignation.

Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksOcasio-Cortez defends decision not to pay dues to House Democratic campaign arm Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Facebook deepfake ban falls short | House passes bills to win 5G race | Feds sound alarm on cyberthreat from Iran | Ivanka Trump appearance at tech show sparks backlash House Democrats urge financial regulators to defend against Iranian cyberattacks MORE (D-N.Y.) said he “agrees with Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe TRUST Act is a plot to gut Social Security behind closed doors Republicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment Bring on the brokered convention MORE."

“There’s no place in this institution for individuals who espouse white supremacy, and so I think that he needs to, he needs to work another place if that's what his perspectives are - he continues to say that so I agree with Mitt Romney," the veteran Democratic lawmaker and member of the Congressional Black Caucus told Hill.TV.

Democratic Rep. John Larson John Barry Larson Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: All eyes on Pelosi as calls for impeachment grow More Democrats threaten impeachment over Trump's dealings with Ukraine MORE (Conn.) said he "will wait and see what actions follow this - but will see what Steve does."

-- Molly K. Hooper