Conservative leader Meadows condemns King comments 'in strongest sense'

GOP lawmakers are lining up to berate Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters Steve King says 'left-wing media' and GOP leadership owe him apology after rape, incest comments 11 Essential reads you missed this week MORE (R-Iowa) for comments he made last week regarding white nationalism and white supremacy.

The latest is conservative GOP lawmaker Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsBen Shapiro: No prominent GOP figure ever questioned Obama's legitimacy Trump finds consistent foil in 'Squad' Gun store billboard going after the 'Squad' being removed following backlash MORE (N.C.), who previously served on the Judiciary panel with King and leads the House Freedom Caucus.

"Candidly those kind of remarks are not something that our should be condoned and certainly should be condemned. And I do in the strongest sense. And so at this point – it's up to the voters of Iowa to determine Steve King's fate,” Meadows told Hill.TV.

The House in a nearly unanimous vote passed a resolution condemning white nationalism and white supremacy on Tuesday, amid the controversy over King. It does not specifically rebuke King, but follows his comments to the New York Times in an article published last Thursday.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked in the interview.

Late Monday, Romney - a freshman Utah senator and the former 2012 GOP presidential contender - called for King to resign over the comments.

A handful of other GOP officials including Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes Hobbled NRA shows strength with Trump MORE (R-Ky.) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyDick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report Steve King says 'left-wing media' and GOP leadership owe him apology after rape, incest comments GOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' MORE (Wyo.) also said King should look for a new job.

Late Monday, House Republicans on the Steering Committee refused to appoint King to any committee assignments.

The top-ranking GOP lawmaker on the Agriculture Committee, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayTexas faces turbulent political moment Democratic Party official: Texas is 'biggest battleground state in the country' Another Texas congressman planning to retire MORE (Texas), who worked alongside King on that panel, explained that denying King a committee seat makes it more difficult to pass legislation.

But Conaway stopped short of saying King should resign.

"That's up to him and the voters in his district to decide that – were taking the steps that I think are appropriate for our for our side and we'll see what Steve does with this new reality he's in," he said.

Democratic lawmakers are also calling for King's resignation.

Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington House Democrat knocks Trump's Cummings tweet: 'This guy is a terrible, terrible human being' Pelosi backers feel vindicated after tumultuous stretch MORE (D-N.Y.) said he “agrees with Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyA US-UK free trade agreement can hold the Kremlin to account Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Overnight Defense: US, Russia tensions grow over nuclear arms | Highlights from Esper's Asia trip | Trump strikes neutral tone on Hong Kong protests | General orders ethics review of special forces MORE."

“There’s no place in this institution for individuals who espouse white supremacy, and so I think that he needs to, he needs to work another place if that's what his perspectives are - he continues to say that so I agree with Mitt Romney," the veteran Democratic lawmaker and member of the Congressional Black Caucus told Hill.TV.

Democratic Rep. John Larson John Barry LarsonThe Social Security 2100 Act is critical for millennials and small business owners Warren introduces universal child care legislation Unchain seniors from chained inflation index MORE (Conn.) said he "will wait and see what actions follow this - but will see what Steve does."

-- Molly K. Hooper