Conservative leader Meadows condemns King comments 'in strongest sense'

GOP lawmakers are lining up to berate Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingGOP brawls over Trump on eve of first Jan. 6 hearing Pence to visit Iowa to headline event for congressman Former Steve King challenger on rural voters in GOP states: 'They hate Democrats' MORE (R-Iowa) for comments he made last week regarding white nationalism and white supremacy.

The latest is conservative GOP lawmaker Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsWhat Trump's enemies are missing Meadows says Trump World looking to 'move forward in a real way' Trump takes two punches from GOP MORE (N.C.), who previously served on the Judiciary panel with King and leads the House Freedom Caucus.

"Candidly those kind of remarks are not something that our should be condoned and certainly should be condemned. And I do in the strongest sense. And so at this point – it's up to the voters of Iowa to determine Steve King's fate,” Meadows told Hill.TV.

The House in a nearly unanimous vote passed a resolution condemning white nationalism and white supremacy on Tuesday, amid the controversy over King. It does not specifically rebuke King, but follows his comments to the New York Times in an article published last Thursday.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked in the interview.

Late Monday, Romney - a freshman Utah senator and the former 2012 GOP presidential contender - called for King to resign over the comments.

A handful of other GOP officials including Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Trump asks court to block release of tax returns to Congress | Private sector adds 330K jobs in July, well short of expectations Senate panel advances first three spending bills McConnell lays out GOP demands for government-funding deal MORE (R-Ky.) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyLiz Cheney says her father is 'deeply troubled' about the state of the Republican Party Ohio special election: A good day for Democrats 58 percent say Jan. 6 House committee is biased: poll MORE (Wyo.) also said King should look for a new job.

Late Monday, House Republicans on the Steering Committee refused to appoint King to any committee assignments.

The top-ranking GOP lawmaker on the Agriculture Committee, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm If Congress can't work together to address child hunger we're doomed Ex-Rep. Mike Conaway, former aide launch lobbying firm MORE (Texas), who worked alongside King on that panel, explained that denying King a committee seat makes it more difficult to pass legislation.

But Conaway stopped short of saying King should resign.

"That's up to him and the voters in his district to decide that – were taking the steps that I think are appropriate for our for our side and we'll see what Steve does with this new reality he's in," he said.

Democratic lawmakers are also calling for King's resignation.

Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksThe Memo: Disgraced Cuomo clings to power Biden calls on Cuomo to resign after harassment probe De Blasio blasts Cuomo over investigation: He should resign or be impeached MORE (D-N.Y.) said he “agrees with Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGraham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate finalizes .2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill Senators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session MORE."

“There’s no place in this institution for individuals who espouse white supremacy, and so I think that he needs to, he needs to work another place if that's what his perspectives are - he continues to say that so I agree with Mitt Romney," the veteran Democratic lawmaker and member of the Congressional Black Caucus told Hill.TV.

Democratic Rep. John Larson John Barry LarsonLobbying world The case for improving America's research and experimentation tax credit To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision MORE (Conn.) said he "will wait and see what actions follow this - but will see what Steve does."

-- Molly K. Hooper