Conservative leader Meadows condemns King comments 'in strongest sense'

GOP lawmakers are lining up to berate Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingSteve King says he can relate to suffering of Jesus The Hill's Morning Report — Combative Trump aims at Pelosi before Russia report Steve King's campaign spent more than it raised last quarter MORE (R-Iowa) for comments he made last week regarding white nationalism and white supremacy.

The latest is conservative GOP lawmaker Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsOn The Money: House to vote on bipartisan retirement bill in May | Mexico now biggest US trading partner | Mulvaney defends record on cutting spending Mulvaney on government spending: 'At least I'm losing at the very highest levels' The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller aftermath: What will House Dems do now? MORE (N.C.), who previously served on the Judiciary panel with King and leads the House Freedom Caucus.

"Candidly those kind of remarks are not something that our should be condoned and certainly should be condemned. And I do in the strongest sense. And so at this point – it's up to the voters of Iowa to determine Steve King's fate,” Meadows told Hill.TV.

The House in a nearly unanimous vote passed a resolution condemning white nationalism and white supremacy on Tuesday, amid the controversy over King. It does not specifically rebuke King, but follows his comments to the New York Times in an article published last Thursday.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked in the interview.

Late Monday, Romney - a freshman Utah senator and the former 2012 GOP presidential contender - called for King to resign over the comments.

A handful of other GOP officials including Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense: Watchdog clears defense chief in ethics probe | Pentagon to handle security background checks | Senate to take up Trump's Yemen veto next week Senate to take up Trump's Yemen veto next week A new age for tobacco — raising the age to 21 is a smart move MORE (R-Ky.) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyRep. Cheney: Socialism 'driving the agenda of the Democratic Party' Dem lawmaker offers tool for 'filling in the blanks' of Green New Deal Judd Gregg: In praise of Mike Enzi MORE (Wyo.) also said King should look for a new job.

Late Monday, House Republicans on the Steering Committee refused to appoint King to any committee assignments.

The top-ranking GOP lawmaker on the Agriculture Committee, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayDems ramp up subpoena threats GOP zeroes in on Schiff Pelosi rushes to Schiff's defense MORE (Texas), who worked alongside King on that panel, explained that denying King a committee seat makes it more difficult to pass legislation.

But Conaway stopped short of saying King should resign.

"That's up to him and the voters in his district to decide that – were taking the steps that I think are appropriate for our for our side and we'll see what Steve does with this new reality he's in," he said.

Democratic lawmakers are also calling for King's resignation.

Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksTreasury expected to miss Dem deadline on Trump tax returns Congress should look into its own taxes and travel, not just Trump's Liberals infuriated by pro-incumbent House Dem policy MORE (D-N.Y.) said he “agrees with Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyBiden's sloppy launch may cost him Election agency limps into 2020 cycle Giuliani: Huckabee would have made 'an excellent president' MORE."

“There’s no place in this institution for individuals who espouse white supremacy, and so I think that he needs to, he needs to work another place if that's what his perspectives are - he continues to say that so I agree with Mitt Romney," the veteran Democratic lawmaker and member of the Congressional Black Caucus told Hill.TV.

Democratic Rep. John Larson John Barry LarsonDemocratic proposals to overhaul health care: A 2020 primer Democratic senators unveil 'Medicare X' bill to expand coverage Stop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave MORE (Conn.) said he "will wait and see what actions follow this - but will see what Steve does."

-- Molly K. Hooper