Conservative leader Meadows condemns King comments 'in strongest sense'

GOP lawmakers are lining up to berate Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingLiz Cheney hits back at Ocasio-Cortez over concentration camp comments: 'This isn't model Congress' Ocasio-Cortez on concentration camp remarks: Liz Cheney, GOP 'manipulating pain for political purposes' Ocasio-Cortez fundraises off criticism from Steve King MORE (R-Iowa) for comments he made last week regarding white nationalism and white supremacy.

The latest is conservative GOP lawmaker Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsJared Kushner, Ivanka Trump to appear at fundraiser for Jim Jordan: report GOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall Darrell Issa eyes return to Congress MORE (N.C.), who previously served on the Judiciary panel with King and leads the House Freedom Caucus.

"Candidly those kind of remarks are not something that our should be condoned and certainly should be condemned. And I do in the strongest sense. And so at this point – it's up to the voters of Iowa to determine Steve King's fate,” Meadows told Hill.TV.

The House in a nearly unanimous vote passed a resolution condemning white nationalism and white supremacy on Tuesday, amid the controversy over King. It does not specifically rebuke King, but follows his comments to the New York Times in an article published last Thursday.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked in the interview.

Late Monday, Romney - a freshman Utah senator and the former 2012 GOP presidential contender - called for King to resign over the comments.

A handful of other GOP officials including Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Democratic debates: Miami nice or spice? Democrats leery of Sanders plan to cancel student loan debt GOP lays debate trap for 2020 Democrats MORE (R-Ky.) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyLiz Cheney hits back at Ocasio-Cortez over concentration camp comments: 'This isn't model Congress' Ocasio-Cortez on concentration camp remarks: Liz Cheney, GOP 'manipulating pain for political purposes' Ocasio-Cortez calls out Steve King, Liz Cheney amid controversy over concentration camp remarks MORE (Wyo.) also said King should look for a new job.

Late Monday, House Republicans on the Steering Committee refused to appoint King to any committee assignments.

The top-ranking GOP lawmaker on the Agriculture Committee, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayOn The Money: House chairman issues subpoenas for Trump's tax returns | Trump touts trade talks as China, US fail to reach deal | Five things to know about Trump's trade war with China | GOP offers support for Trump on tariffs GOP offers support for Trump on China tariffs On The Money: New tariffs on China pose major risk for Trump | Senators sound alarm over looming budget battles | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders team up against payday lenders MORE (Texas), who worked alongside King on that panel, explained that denying King a committee seat makes it more difficult to pass legislation.

But Conaway stopped short of saying King should resign.

"That's up to him and the voters in his district to decide that – were taking the steps that I think are appropriate for our for our side and we'll see what Steve does with this new reality he's in," he said.

Democratic lawmakers are also calling for King's resignation.

Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksTop Finance Democrat offers bill to end tax breaks for private prison companies Criticism punctuates Nadler's leadership of Trump probe A true believer in diversity, inclusion MORE (D-N.Y.) said he “agrees with Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenate panel advances bill to restrict emergency arms sales Who is new White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham? Biden leads among Hispanic voters in key states: polls MORE."

“There’s no place in this institution for individuals who espouse white supremacy, and so I think that he needs to, he needs to work another place if that's what his perspectives are - he continues to say that so I agree with Mitt Romney," the veteran Democratic lawmaker and member of the Congressional Black Caucus told Hill.TV.

Democratic Rep. John Larson John Barry LarsonWarren introduces universal child care legislation Unchain seniors from chained inflation index A tax increase is simply not the answer to fund Social Security MORE (Conn.) said he "will wait and see what actions follow this - but will see what Steve does."

-- Molly K. Hooper