Giuliani says Trump employed Cohen because he felt 'sorry' for him

Rudy Giuliani claimed Friday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE kept personal attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenCapitol Police advised Gaetz against holding open events I'm not a Nazi, I'm just a dude: What it's like to be the other Steve King Wyden blasts FEC Republicans for blocking probe into NRA over possible Russia donations MORE on board his legal team because he felt “sorry” for him.

“I don’t want to get him angry, I think the president felt sorry for him because he never could quite have the standing of the lawyers,” Giuliani, the former New York city mayor working as a lawyer for Trump, told Hill.TV’s Buck Sexton during an interview with “Rising.”

“All of the important matters would go to other lawyers, so he’d give him things to do that were more in the nature of public relations, but some small legal matters,” he continued.

Giuliani also pushed back on claims that Cohen never asked for a presidential pardon.

“The man never asked for a pardon — perjury,” the Trump’s attorney told Hill.TV.

Cohen’s team team admitted Wednesday that he asked Trump’s lawyers about a potential presidential pardon last year after the FBI raided his home and office.

Cohen’s attorney Lanny Davis issued a statement, saying that at the time Cohen was open to the “ongoing ‘dangling’ of a possible pardon by Trump representatives.”

This statement appears to contradict Cohen's sworn testimony last week, when he said that he had “never” asked for a pardon from Trump.

Following these new revelations, House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsGOP Oversight report says Interior head met with group tied to former clients Nadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision Nikki Haley voices 'complete support' for Pence MORE (D-Md.) said Thursday that he needs to revisit Cohen’s remarks under oath before deciding whether to refer him to the Justice Department for possible prosecution.

Cohen, meanwhile, is awaiting a three-year prison sentence for financial crimes and charges related to hush money payments to women alleging to have had affairs with Trump. The president recently acknowledged the payments but claimed that the act didn't constitute a campaign finance violation. 

—Tess Bonn