Ex-federal prosecutor says there's enough evidence to corroborate Cohen testimony on hush money payments

Former federal prosecutor Gene Rossi told Hill.TV's "Rising" on Monday that there is evidence to corroborate a claim from President TrumpDonald John TrumpLiz Cheney: 'Send her back' chant 'inappropriate' but not about race, gender Booker: Trump is 'worse than a racist' Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller MORE's former attorney, Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenWhat to expect when Mueller testifies: Not much Cummings asks prosecutors about decision not to charge Trump in hush money probe Judiciary chair demands Hope Hicks clarify closed-door testimony MORE, that Trump was aware of the scheme to get Stormy Daniels to stay quiet about an alleged affairs with the president. 

"I have called three perjurers in an organized crime case, and the key to perjurers and people that lie is corroboration," Rossi told hosts Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton. 

"Those checks, the ones signed by [Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTrump campaign selling branded plastic straws as alternative to 'liberal paper straws' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question Trump set to host controversial social media summit MORE] and Allen Weisselberg. Allen's the big one," he continued, referring to the Trump Organization's chief finance officer.

"Those checks and the one that President Trump signed in August of '17, they corroborate, in part, what Cohen said." 

"If you got documents to corroborate, emails. The September 7, 2016, tape of Cohen and the president, that's pretty good evidence to corroborate what Cohen's saying," Rossi added. 

Last month, Cohen presented the House Oversight and Reform Committee with two $35,000 checks that he said were reimbursements for the $130,000 in hush money payments he gave to Daniels prior to the 2016 election. 

One of the checks was signed by President Trump and the other was signed by Weisselberg and the president's eldest son. 

Trump has denied the alleged affair and has said that the hush money arrangement did not violate campaign finance laws.

— Julia Manchester