Marianne Williamson on reparations: 'Anything less than $100 billion is an insult'

Democratic presidential hopeful Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonWilliamson slams DNC, Tuesday's debate: 'This would all be funny if it weren't so dangerous' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Hunter Biden speaks out amid Ukraine controversy 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the October showdown MORE made her case for paying reparations to descendants of slaves during an interview with Hill.TV on Tuesday, saying she would consider anything less than $100 billion an “insult.”

“What I have proposed is $200 to $500 billion — I think anything less than $100 billion is an insult,” Williamson, an author and activist, told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball and Buck Sexton, adding that the money would be paid over a 20-year period.

Williamson suggested creating a council to oversee the disbursement of funds to programs that benefit descendants of slaves, saying the money could be distributed as "they see fit."

“We should have a reparations council, board of trustees as it were, selecting this counsel – very, very significant because it has to be a board of trustees ... [that] white America trusts and black America trusts,” the Democratic candidate told Hill.TV.

Williamson said the need for reparations is crucial to healing the nation's racial divide, saying most Americans remain “undereducated” about the “real history of race.”

“I don’t think the average American is a racist — actually, I don’t at all,” she said. “But I do think the average American is vastly undereducated, underinformed about the real history of race in the United States.”

Williamson is one of the most outspoken supporters of reparations, but a handful of Democratic hopefuls have also expressed support for the idea.

Democratic Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick Lobbying world MORE (N.Y), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets Democrats have reason to worry after the last presidential debate 2020 Democrats recognize Pronouns Day MORE (Calif), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenButtigieg tweeted support for 'Medicare for All' in 2018 Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems change drug pricing bill to address progressive concerns | Top Republican rejects Dem proposal on surprise medical bills | Vaping group launches Fox News ad blitz Hillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets MORE (Mass.) and Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets O'Rourke rips Bill O'Reilly: The problem with our economy is 'a disgraced TV host like you makes millions' O'Rourke on whether mass shooters would hand over weapons: 'I expect our fellow Americans to follow the law' MORE (Texas) have all voiced some level of support for reparations, saying the issue should be further reviewed. Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker2020 Democrats recognize Pronouns Day Third-quarter fundraising sets Sanders, Warren, Buttigieg apart The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump seeks distance from Syria crisis MORE (D-N.J). this month introduced legislation to study granting reparations to African Americans.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, who is also running for the Democratic nomination, has said that he would not rule out reparations.

"We have never fully addressed in this country the original sin of slavery and because of that we have never truly healed as a country," Castro said during a CNN town hall last week.

Still, the topic remains an area of much debate among Democrats running for president in 2020.

In response to a question on whether he would support a reparation plan, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems change drug pricing bill to address progressive concerns | Top Republican rejects Dem proposal on surprise medical bills | Vaping group launches Fox News ad blitz Democrats have reason to worry after the last presidential debate Krystal Ball on Sanders debate performance: 'He absolutely hit it out of the park' MORE (I-Vt.) said recently that there are "better ways" than "just writing a check."

“I think that right now, our job is to address the crises facing the American people and our communities, and I think there are better ways to do that than just writing out a check,” Sanders said during an appearance on ABC's "The View" last month. 

—Tess Bonn