Peter Schweizer: Hunter Biden needs to testify on Ukraine, China business dealings

Government Accountability Institute President Peter Schweizer in an exclusive interview with Hill.TV called for former Vice President and 2020 White House contender Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Sanders to call on 2020 Democrats to reject money from drug, health insurance industries Harris tops Biden in California 2020 poll MORE's son to testify before the U.S. Senate about business dealings with Ukraine and China. 

"What I’ve called for simply is for the Senate to call former second son Hunter Biden to come and testify and people look into this," Schweizer said during a lengthy interview on Hunter Biden's  business dealings. "We’re talking about large deals and large sums of money...it involves countries like China, which are America’s chief rival on the global stage." 

The researcher provided an overview of Hunter Biden's alleged business dealings with Ukrainian energy company Burisma and the Chinese government in a recent New York Post op-ed that details  payments of more than $3 million to Hunter Biden's company during a 14-month period when his father was the point person on Ukraine policy for the Obama administration. 

"In the case of the Ukraine, the very energy company that was paying Hunter Biden millions of dollars was under investigation in the Ukraine for corruption. Ukrainian officials have claimed that Joe Biden pressured them to suspend or end that investigation. That’s in fact what the Ukraine did," Schweizer said in a summary of his findings.  

Schweizer during the Hill.TV interview also referenced reporting from The Hill's John Solomon who reported in early May that Ukrainian officials are reviewing internal corruption allegations against the energy company that employed Hunter Biden. Solomon also wrote that "U.S. and Ukrainian authorities both told me Biden and his office clearly had to know about the general prosecutor's probe of Burisma and his son's role." 

The former vice president told The New York Times in a recent statement that his son's business dealings was not a consideration in pressuring Ukraine to fire its prosecutor general, noting the decision was made “without any regard for how it would or would not impact any business interests of his son, a private citizen.”

Hunter Biden also issued a statement declaring that "at no time have I discussed with my father the company’s business, or my board service, including my initial decision to join the board" of the Ukrainian energy company. 

Schweizer's op-ed also details Hunter Biden's alleged dealings with China, noting how the former second son accompanied his father on an official trip to Beijing in 2013 only to then have his company ink a $1 billion private equity deal with the Chinese government two weeks later.

"Hunter Biden at the time had no background in China and had little background in private equity," he wrote.