Roger Stone considers suing to discover if he was spied on by FBI

Conservative operative and provocateur Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneDOJ backs ex-Trump campaign aide Rick Gates's probation request Schiff says investigators seeking to identify who Giuliani spoke to on unlisted '-1' number What if impeachment fails? MORE is considering suing the federal government to determine if he was the subject of an FBI surveillance effort on the Trump campaign, his attorney wrote in letters to U.S. officials and lawmakers exclusively obtained by Hill.TV.

Stone's attorney leveled the threat in letters to U.S. Attorney John DurhamJohn DurhamBarr criticizes FBI, says it's possible agents acted in 'bad faith' in Trump probe Democrats rip Barr over IG statement: 'Mouthpiece' for Trump Barr: Horowitz report shows FBI launched Trump campaign investigation on 'thinnest of suspicions' MORE, Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: FBI investigation in 2016 turned into a 'criminal conspiracy' This week: House impeachment inquiry hits crucial stretch Senate braces for brawl on Trump impeachment rules MORE (R-S.C.), and ranking House Intelligence Committee member Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today Controversy on phone records intensifies amid impeachment Tempers flare at tense Judiciary hearing on impeachment MORE (R-Calif.).

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"We have strong reason to believe that Mr. Stone was among three advisors to candidate Trump who was under surveillance by the FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign," Stone's attorney Paul Jensen wrote in the May 20 letter. 

Jensen wrote in the letter he based the charges against the FBI on a New York Times front page story from January 20, 2017 titled "Wiretapped Data Used in Inquiry of Trump Aides." The story describes how the FBI was reviewing intercepted communications between associates of Trump and the Russian government. It specifically mentions Stone, former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortDOJ backs ex-Trump campaign aide Rick Gates's probation request Former FBI general counsel wants apology from Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today MORE, and former Trump advisor Carter Page as targets of the investigation.

"Having exhausted our administrative remedies we are now contemplating a tort lawsuit as a means to force the government to disclose the facts in this serious matter and to determine if Mr. Stone's 4th amendment rights were violated," Jensen's letter continues, also calling on Trump to fulfill a promise to declassify troves of FBI and DOJ documents relating to the investigation of his 2016 campaign. 

Stone provided no evidence to substantiate his claim, though his inclusion of U.S. Attorney Durham is noteworthy. Durham was appointed by Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrBarr criticizes FBI, says it's possible agents acted in 'bad faith' in Trump probe Barr: 'I haven't looked into' whether Ukraine meddled in 2016 election Facebook tells Trump administration it will not create messaging 'backdoor' for law enforcement MORE to investigate possible FBI impropriety during the 2016 presidential campaign. 

Stone is currently awaiting trial on seven counts brought by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's team including allegedly making false statements to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing a government investigation.