Progressive Democrat says Trump victory shed light on divide between Silicon Valley, rural US

Progressive Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaKing incites furor with abortion, rape and incest remarks San Jose mayor proposes mandatory liability insurance for gun owners Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax MORE (D-Calif.) acknowledged that President TrumpDonald John Trump Former US ambassador: 'Denmark is not a big fan of Donald Trump and his politics' Senate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Detroit county sheriff endorses Booker for president MORE’s 2016 election served as a “wake-up call” that rural Americans have been left out of the economic successes stemming from industries like tech.

“There’s an awareness that not a lot of rural America has participated in the economic success,” Khanna told Hill.TV’s Krystal Ball and Saagar Enjeti.

“I think his election highlighted it,” he added. “I think it was a wake-up call for a lot of people around the country, including in Silicon Valley.”

Silicon Valley makes up a large portion of Khanna’s district.

However, tensions have emerged between progressives like 2020 contender Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Top adviser on Sanders: 'He's always been underestimated' 'The Simpsons' pokes fun at Trump's feud with 'the squad' MORE (I-Vt.) and Silicon Valley corporations like Facebook.

Last week, Sanders joined fellow progressive and 2020 primary opponent, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Top adviser on Sanders: 'He's always been underestimated' 'The Simpsons' pokes fun at Trump's feud with 'the squad' MORE (D-Mass.), in calling for Facebook to break up amid anti-trust concerns.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden expands lead in new national poll Castro qualifies for next Democratic primary debates MORE (D-Hawaii) has also called for the social media giant to break up.

“This idea that 6,000 millionaires are created in my district as Uber goes public. Even people who were administrative assistants may have become millionaires depending on when they joined Uber,” Khanna said.

“In the rest of the country are not making $15 dollars [an hour] and aren’t being able to have a standard of living to be apart of the middle class, and are often driving Ubers because they face deindustrialization of their communities or the loss of jobs,” he continued.

“There’s a stark divide in this country, and Bernie Sanders speaks to that with moral clarity,” he said. “Now, they may have different solutions in how they would get job creation in places left behind and that we debate.”

— Julia Manchester