Former Senate Dem leader: 'No way' impeachment trial for Trump would lead to conviction

Former Democratic Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle on Wednesday cast doubt on whether an impeachment trial would bring a conviction against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump cites tax cuts over judges as having biggest impact of his presidency Trump cites tax cuts over judges as having biggest impact of his presidency Ocasio-Cortez claps back at Trump after he cites her in tweet rejecting impeachment MORE.

Daschle told Hill.TV that while House Democrats have a responsibility to conduct oversight over the White House, he thinks there is "absolutely no way a trial on impeachment would bring about a conviction.”

Daschle, who currently sits on the board of directors at the Center for American Progress, urged lawmakers to "hold off" on launching impeachment proceedings.

“I think it’s really important to play the role of oversight — to do everything responsible around that role,” he said. “But we’ve got to hold off on impeachment.”

Daschle praised Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOcasio-Cortez claps back at Trump after he cites her in tweet rejecting impeachment Ocasio-Cortez claps back at Trump after he cites her in tweet rejecting impeachment GOP nervous that border wall fight could prompt year-end shutdown MORE (D-Calif.) and her leadership as she faces growing pressure from progressive Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry against Trump.

“Nancy Pelosi has got it about right,” he told Hill.TV. “She says it ought to be out on the table but she’s opposed to taking any steps towards impeachment at this point.”

The former South Dakota senator played a key role during former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonCampaign dads fit fatherhood between presidential speeches Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments Dems eye repeal of Justice rule barring presidential indictments MORE’s impeachment, serving as Senate manager during the trial. Clinton was impeached by the House in wake of his affair with a 22-year old White House intern, but was acquitted by the Senate two months later.

“We are still experience to this day the divisiveness and the dysfunction that came out of that experience,” Daschle told Hill.TV. “It was an incredibly difficult and polarizing moment for the country.”

Daschle’s comments come after the House granted new legal powers to a key committee investigating the Trump administration.

The House approved a resolution allowing House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerFrom abortion to obstruction, politicians' hypocrisy is showing Watergate figure John Dean earns laughter for responses to GOP lawmakers The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by MAPRx - Nadler gets breakthrough deal with DOJ on Mueller docs MORE (D-N.Y.) to enforce congressional subpoenas for Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrAnticipation builds for final Supreme Court rulings Anticipation builds for final Supreme Court rulings Trump's Justice Department should change its tune on antitrust policy MORE and former White House counsel Don McGahn. This comes just a day after Nadler reached a deal with the Department of Justice that allows lawmakers to review key underlying evidence from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE's report, staving off a legal court battle for the time being.

—Tess Bonn