Giuliani warns Epstein case could 'implicate a lot of people'

Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani says he discussed Biden with Ukrainian official Trump doubles down on Jewish controversy Trump retweets baby elephant video MORE, a personal attorney for President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE, warned Monday that a renewed investigation into registered sex offender Jeffrey Epstein could potentially implicate many more prominent individuals.

Epstein was indicted earlier this month on sex trafficking charges. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan alleged that the billionaire financier abused dozens of minors from 2002 to 2005 by creating “a network and operation enabling him to sexually exploit and abuse dozens of underage girls.”

Epstein has denied any wrongdoing and he has since been ordered to remain in detention until his hearing after he was deemed a flight risk.

“It’s obviously going to implicate a lot of people — I can’t tell you who but it’s not going to end up with just Jeffrey Epstein,” Giuliani told Hill.TV during an interview on “Rising.”

Giuliani said investigators will likely question those in his inner circle and question how they could have possibly missed the potential warning signs.

“If you spent this much time with him and he was so involved with these underaged girls — who did you see him with and what was he doing and what did he tell you and what did he say to you and how could you have missed it,” he told Hill.TV. “Maybe some were innocent — maybe some weren’t, but I think they’re going to investigate everybody.”

The new charges against Epstein come more than a decade after the sixty-five-year-old pleaded guilty to sex trafficking and was sentenced to 13 months in prison. They have since renewed scrutiny on a 2008 plea deal that was secured in part by outgoing Trump administration Labor Secretary Alex AcostaAlex Alexander AcostaOur farmers need a better labor program Three more Epstein accusers sue estate Barr removes prisons chief after Epstein death MORE, who resigned this month over the backlash.

Acosta was a U.S. attorney at the time of Epstein’s conviction for soliciting prostitution from underage girls, and allowed Epstein to serve 13 months in "custody with work release.”

Florida sheriff Ric Bradshaw recently launched an investigation into whether deputies properly managed his work release during that period.

Epstein's charges have also raised questions over President Trump’s own relationship with Epstein as both men previously ran in many of the same social circles in New York. NBC News released a previously unseen video that shows Trump and the wealthy financier laughing and talking at a party in 1992. 

Trump has sought to distance himself from Epstein in light of the latest charges, saying he hasn’t spoken to him in 15 years and that he is “not a fan.”

―Tess Bonn