Bullock: Recognizing dark money's influence key to addressing climate change, gun violence

Democratic presidential hopeful Steve BullockSteve BullockBullock mocks Trump with online tool to determine if Greenland is for sale CNN to host de Blasio, Bullock town halls Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE said Wednesday that increasing transparency in campaign finance laws is key to addressing issues like climate change and gun violence.

Speaking after an event at the National Press Club on Wednesday in Washington, D.C., Bullock said battling "dark money" had been the fight of his career.

“Some people say that this is a fringe issue but when we talk about climate change, when we talk a about gun safety and gun violence, when we talk about economic inequality, when we talk about prescription drug prices, so much of it is we don’t actually address the corrupted influenced of money in the system that drives this city,” he said.

Bullock, a longshot presidential hopeful, has made fighting dark money a central issue of his campaign.

As Montana's governor, Bullock has worked to crack down on dark money in the state. In 2015, he signed a bipartisan bill requiring anonymous dark money groups to disclose how they are spending money in state-wide races.

Bullock has been polling around less than 1 percent support for much of the 2020 race. Still, he was able to qualify for last week's second Democratic presidential debates, after failing to do so the first time around. Speaking first during last week's debate, Bullock knocked liberal heavyweights Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren unveils Native American policy plan Poll: Support for Sanders among college students reaches highest level since April Obama has taken active interest in Biden's campaign: report MORE (D-Mass) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Support for Sanders among college students reaches highest level since April The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE (I-Vt.) over what he characterized as their “wish-list economics.”

⁠—Tess Bonn