President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial Warren goes local in race to build 2020 movement 2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes MORE’s approval rating dropped significantly among men, according to a new national poll released on Tuesday.

Trump’s approval among men fell to 47 percent, which marks an 11-point drop compared to an identical poll conducted on Sept. 28 and 29.

However, the survey also found that his approval rating was up 4 points at 45 percent among women.

Overall, Trump’s approval dipped to 46 percent after climbing to September's career-high of 49 percent. 

His disapproval, meanwhile, ticked up to 54 percent, a 3-point increase.

Men, particularly white men and suburban voters, made up a significant portion of the voting base that helped deliver Trump his electoral win over Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes The Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary Manafort sought to hurt Clinton 2016 campaign efforts in key states: NYT MORE in 2016.

Trump’s approval rating has remained in the mid-40 range over the course of his presidency, even though he has faced a number of controversies.

House Democrats launched the inquiry last month into Trump’s communications with Ukraine following a whistleblower's complaint.

The complaint detailed a request that was made to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky for the country to look into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenGOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial 2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes 2020 Dems put focus on stemming veteran suicides MORE and his son, just days after Trump moved to delay hundreds of millions in dollars in U.S. aid to Kiev.

While the inquiry has largely taken place behind doors, House Democrats plan to vote for the first time on impeachment procedures on Thursday amid GOP criticism that the process has been unfair.

The Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted between Oct. 27 and Oct. 28 among 1,000 registered voters. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

—Tess Bonn