Top Democrat: Getting Trump off the ballot wouldn't benefit party

House Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthGOP, White House struggle to unite behind COVID-19 relief House seeks ways to honor John Lewis Karen Bass's star rises after leading police reform push MORE (D-Ky.) said even though he supports the House impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Michael Cohen book accuses Trump of corruption, fraud Trump requests mail-in ballot for Florida congressional primary MORE, removing him from the ballot wouldn't help the Democratic Party in 2020.

“As much as I believe that President Trump should be removed from office and represents an imminent threat to our Democracy and our national security and many other things, politically — it’s probably not a good thing to get rid of him,” Yarmuth told Hill.TV on Monday.

Yarmuth predicted that if Trump was ultimately impeached and removed from office, the GOP would replace him with an even more formidable general election opponent like former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyNikki Haley trolled over complaints about The Popcorn Factory Tennessee primary battle turns nasty for Republicans The 'pitcher of warm spit' — Veepstakes and the fate of Mike Pence MORE, who has repeatedly been floated as a potential Republican presidential candidate.

“I don’t think the Republican would nominate [Vice President] Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump threatens Postal Service funding l Biden proposes national mask mandate l Democratic convention takes shape Biden and Harris seen as more moderate than Trump and Pence: poll Pence on debating Harris: 'I can't wait' MORE. I think they would nominate somebody like Nikki Haley. Somebody who would be very, very tough for a Democrat to beat,” he said.

Yarmuth’s comments come as House Democrats continue to shift their impeachment inquiry into the public light.

Investigators on Monday released two transcripts from closed-door meetings with a pair of former and current State Department officials.

More transcripts from key witnesses are set to be released in the coming days.

—Tess Bonn