Top Democrat: Getting Trump off the ballot wouldn't benefit party

House Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthBlue Dogs push Democrats to pass budget Democrats don't expect to do 2020 budget Trump shocks, earns GOP rebukes with Dingell remarks MORE (D-Ky.) said even though he supports the House impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE, removing him from the ballot wouldn't help the Democratic Party in 2020.

“As much as I believe that President Trump should be removed from office and represents an imminent threat to our Democracy and our national security and many other things, politically — it’s probably not a good thing to get rid of him,” Yarmuth told Hill.TV on Monday.

Yarmuth predicted that if Trump was ultimately impeached and removed from office, the GOP would replace him with an even more formidable general election opponent like former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyJudd Apatow urges Georgia voters to get rid of Doug Collins after 'terrorists' comment Nikki Haley: Democratic leadership, 2020 Dems are the only people mourning Soleimani death Trump Jr., Ivanka garner support in hypothetical 2024 poll MORE, who has repeatedly been floated as a potential Republican presidential candidate.

“I don’t think the Republican would nominate [Vice President] Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceParnas: Environment around Trump 'like a cult' White House pushes back on Parnas allegations The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to lay out impeachment case to senators next week MORE. I think they would nominate somebody like Nikki Haley. Somebody who would be very, very tough for a Democrat to beat,” he said.

Yarmuth’s comments come as House Democrats continue to shift their impeachment inquiry into the public light.

Investigators on Monday released two transcripts from closed-door meetings with a pair of former and current State Department officials.

More transcripts from key witnesses are set to be released in the coming days.

—Tess Bonn