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Top Democrat: Getting Trump off the ballot wouldn't benefit party

House Budget Committee Chairman John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthThe GOP's debt boogieman is hurting families and derailing our recovery Pelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power GOP, White House struggle to unite behind COVID-19 relief MORE (D-Ky.) said even though he supports the House impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden adds to vote margin over Trump after Milwaukee County recount Krebs says allegations of foreign interference in 2020 election 'farcical'  Republicans ready to become deficit hawks again under a President Biden MORE, removing him from the ballot wouldn't help the Democratic Party in 2020.

“As much as I believe that President Trump should be removed from office and represents an imminent threat to our Democracy and our national security and many other things, politically — it’s probably not a good thing to get rid of him,” Yarmuth told Hill.TV on Monday.

Yarmuth predicted that if Trump was ultimately impeached and removed from office, the GOP would replace him with an even more formidable general election opponent like former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyThe Memo: GOP mulls its future after Trump O'Brien on 2024 talk: 'There's all kinds of speculation out there' New administration, House turnover raise prospects for more diversity on K Street MORE, who has repeatedly been floated as a potential Republican presidential candidate.

“I don’t think the Republican would nominate [Vice President] Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceTrump set for precedent-breaking lame-duck period Trump pardons Michael Flynn O'Brien on 2024 talk: 'There's all kinds of speculation out there' MORE. I think they would nominate somebody like Nikki Haley. Somebody who would be very, very tough for a Democrat to beat,” he said.

Yarmuth’s comments come as House Democrats continue to shift their impeachment inquiry into the public light.

Investigators on Monday released two transcripts from closed-door meetings with a pair of former and current State Department officials.

More transcripts from key witnesses are set to be released in the coming days.

—Tess Bonn