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Democratic strategist 'remarkably unimpressed' by potential Bloomberg 2020 bid

Democratic strategist Don Calloway on Friday shrugged off reports that former New York Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergBiden's domestic and global challenges on COVID vaccinations Press: Even Jeff Bezos should pay income taxes What the Democrats should be doing to reach true bipartisanship MORE’s possible 2020 bid could shake up the Democratic primary.

“The best thing I can say is, ‘yawn,’” Calloway, the CEO of Pine Street Strategies, told Hill.TV.

“I am just remarkably unimpressed; I’m uninterested,” he added. “Michael Bloomberg doesn’t bring anything to this field that you are looking for that is missing.”

Calloway argued that Bloomberg, who is a former Republican and independent, would better served by running as a third-party candidate, even though that move would likely help President TrumpDonald Trump Pence said he's 'proud' Congress certified Biden's win on Jan. 6 Americans put the most trust in their doctor for COVID-19 information: poll OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Biden administration to evacuate Afghans who helped US l Serious differences remain between US and Iran on nuclear talks l US, Turkish officials meet to discuss security plans for Afghan airport MORE’s chances in 2020.

"I’m wondering why he doesn’t run as an independent or third-party candidate of some sort — I just don’t really understand," he said, adding that such a move would be "true to what he’s bringing to the table."

Calloway’s comments come after a Bloomberg spokesperson told CNN on Thursday that the billionaire executive is expected to file paperwork for the Democratic presidential primary in Alabama this week.

While the spokesperson maintained that Bloomberg has not yet made a final decision on whether he will jump into the race, he is already being viewed by some as a centrist alternative to candidates such as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden Pence said he's 'proud' Congress certified Biden's win on Jan. 6 Americans put the most trust in their doctor for COVID-19 information: poll US to give Afghanistan 3M doses of J&J vaccine MORE.

If the former New York mayor does enter the race, he would be the second billionaire businessman after Tom SteyerTom SteyerTop 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study California Democrats weigh their recall options Why we should be leery of companies entering political fray MORE, who has already spent millions in advertising but registers at less than 1 percent nationally, according to the RealClearPolitics average of polls.

—Tess Bonn