More Democrats in poll say Trump will finish first term amid impeachment inquiry

An increasing number of Democrats says President TrumpDonald John TrumpDems want tougher language on election security in defense bill Five aides to Van Drew resign ahead of his formal switch to GOP The myth of the conservative bestseller MORE will finish his first term as the impeachment battle heats up, according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll.

The survey of 445 Democratic voters found that 56 percent said they think Trump will remain in office until 2020, a 7-point uptick compared to the results of an identical poll last month.

Twenty-five percent of Democrats in the new survey, meanwhile, said they think Trump will leave office before the end of his first term.

A larger percentage of the 385 Republicans polled also said Trump would finish his first term.

The percentage of GOP voters who said that the president would complete his term increased from 89 percent in October to 93 percent in the latest survey.

Seventy-four percent of 349 independent respondents now said the same thing, marking a 14-point increase from the Oct. 11 poll.

Overall, 73 percent of voters in the new survey said it was likely that Trump would complete his first term, while 14 percent said it was unlikely. Thirteen percent said they weren't sure.

The survey comes as Democrats begin their first day of public hearings as part of their ongoing impeachment inquiry into whether Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate his political rivals.

The first two witnesses — diplomats William Taylor and George Kent — are testifying before lawmakers on the House Intelligence Committee.

The White House, meanwhile, has dismissed the public hearing as “boring” and a “sham,” arguing that Democrats should instead be focused on passing the new trade deal known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

Trump also went on the offensive, tweeting "NEVER TRUMPERS" and "READ THE TRANSCRIPT" just hours before the hearing was set to begin.

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 1,204 registered voters between Nov. 8 and Nov. 9. The margin of error for the full sample was 2.8 percentage points. The sampling error for partisan voters is higher.

—Tess Bonn