Sanders reclaims second place in new 2020 poll

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report MORE (I-Vt.) outpaces progressive 2020 rival Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Mnuchin, Schumer in talks to strike short-term relief deal | Small businesses struggling for loans | Treasury IG sends Dems report on handling of Trump tax returns Trump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden Senators push for changes to small business aid MORE (D-Mass.) for second place nationally, according to a Hill-HarrisX poll released on Monday.

Among likely Democratic and Democratic-leaning independent voters, Sanders holds 18 percent support, followed by Warren with 15 percent. 

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left MORE still leads the pack with 30 percent support, a 4-point increase compared to his low of 26 percent earlier this month.

No other candidate registered double-digit support, with South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE in a distant fourth place with 7 percent and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOn The Money: Mnuchin, Schumer in talks to strike short-term relief deal | Small businesses struggling for loans | Treasury IG sends Dems report on handling of Trump tax returns Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Calif.) in fifth with 4 percent. 

Former New York Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders drops out of presidential race New York City auctioned off extra ventilators due to cost of maintenance: report MORE, who has yet to formally announce his 2020 bid, registered at 3 percent in the latest survey.

The rest of the Democratic field, including businessman Andrew YangAndrew YangFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Jack Dorsey committing billion to coronavirus relief efforts Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis MORE and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president Democrats salivate over Obama coming off sidelines MORE (D-N.J.), registered at 2 percent or less.

The survey comes ahead of the fifth Democratic presidential primary debate this week in Atlanta.

Wednesday night's MSNBC debate is set to feature 10 candidates: Biden, Warren, Sanders, Harris, Buttigieg, Booker, Yang, billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Candidates want data privacy rules, except for their own campaigns Budowsky: Biden should pull together a 'dream team of rivals' MORE, as well as Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order The Hill's Morning Report — ,000,000,000,000: GOP unveils historic US rescue effort Gillibrand endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Hawaii) and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Minn.).

In order to qualify for the November debate, the candidates had to garner support from at least 165,000 unique donors and register at least 3 percent in four qualifying polls or 5 percent in two early-state polls.

The new Hill-HarrisX poll surveyed 449 registered voters online between Nov. 16 and Nov. 17. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.6 percentage points.

—Tess Bonn