Poll: Interest in impeachment inquiry dips among Democratic voters

Democratic voters appear to be losing interest in House Democrats’ ongoing impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump fires intelligence community inspector general who flagged Ukraine whistleblower complaint Trump organization has laid off over 1000 employees due to pandemic: report Trump invokes Defense Production Act to prevent export of surgical masks, gloves MORE, according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll released on Monday.

The number of Democratic voters who say they are paying close attention to the impeachment inquiry fell 5 percentage points to 73 percent in the latest nationwide survey.

The amount of independent and GOP voters who are keeping an eye on impeachment also saw a decrease. Fifty-nine percent of independent voters said they are paying attention to the inquiry, while 64 percent of Republicans say the same.

After holding steady at 70 percent in the past two surveys, the overall number of voters who said they are following the probe fell for the first time to 65 percent.

Unlike the prior surveys, the latest one was taken after Democrats held their first public hearing as part of their months-long impeachment inquiry. State Department officials William Taylor and George Kent kicked off the first round of televised hearings earlier this month. 

Since then a number of former and current administration officials have testified on Trump’s dealings with Ukraine and whether he pressured the country into launching politically-motivated investigations into his political rivals. 

Gordon SondlandGordon SondlandWhite House withdraws nomination for Pentagon budget chief who questioned Ukraine aid hold Juan Williams: Will the GOP ever curb Trump? House wants documents on McEntee's security clearances MORE's testimony in particular marked a turning point after the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union testified that Trump explicitly sought a “quid pro quo” with Ukraine, conditioning a White House visit for politically-motivated investigations into Democrats.

Despite a lack of testimony from multiple potential key witnesses, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffTrump fires intelligence community inspector general who flagged Ukraine whistleblower complaint Hannity blasts criticism of Fox News: 'I have taken this seriously' Pelosi forms House committee to oversee coronavirus response MORE (D-Calif.) told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday that the panel plans to move forward with its upcoming impeachment report.

The House's move to hold an impeachment vote seems inevitable at this point, though articles of impeachment are unlikely to pass in the Senate. The Senate does, however, plan to hold a full impeachment trial. Senate Republicans, including Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP senator: National shelter-in-place order would be an 'overreaction' Lawmakers already planning more coronavirus stimulus after T package Cuban says he'd spank daughter if she was partying during coronavirus pandemic MORE (R-Texas), have stated that any motion for an early dismissal of impeachment charges won’t likely have the votes to pass.

The Hill-HarrisX poll surveyed 1,000 registered voters from Nov. 17-18 and has a margin of error of 3.1 percentage points. Sampling error among partisan voters is higher.

—Tess Bonn

Updated: 5:13 p.m.